privation


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pri·va·tion

 (prī-vā′shən)
n.
1.
a. Lack of the basic necessities or comforts of life: living in times of privation.
b. An act, condition, or result of deprivation or loss: endured the privations of war.
2. The condition of being without a specified quality or attribute: the privation of liberty.

[Middle English privacion, from Old French privation, from Latin prīvātiō, prīvātiōn-, from prīvātus, past participle of prīvāre, to deprive; see private.]

privation

(praɪˈveɪʃən)
n
1. loss or lack of the necessities of life, such as food and shelter
2. hardship resulting from this
3. the state of being deprived
4. (Logic) logic obsolete the absence from an object of what ordinarily or naturally belongs to such objects
[C14: from Latin prīvātiō deprivation]

pri•va•tion

(praɪˈveɪ ʃən)

n.
1. lack of the usual comforts or necessaries of life.
2. an instance of this.
3. the act of depriving.
4. the state of being deprived.
[1350–1400; Middle English (< Middle French) < Medieval Latin prīvātiō deprivation (of office), Latin: removal (of a condition). See private, -tion]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.privation - a state of extreme povertyprivation - a state of extreme poverty    
impoverishment, poorness, poverty - the state of having little or no money and few or no material possessions
2.privation - act of depriving someone of food or money or rights; "nutritional privation"; "deprivation of civil rights"
social control - control exerted (actively or passively) by group action
pauperisation, pauperization, impoverishment - the act of making someone poor
starving, starvation - the act of depriving of food or subjecting to famine; "the besiegers used starvation to induce surrender"; "they were charged with the starvation of children in their care"

privation

noun (Formal) want, poverty, need, suffering, loss, lack, distress, misery, necessity, hardship, penury, destitution, neediness, indigence They endured years of privation during the war.

privation

noun
2. The condition of being deprived of what one once had or ought to have:
Translations
فَقْر، فاقَه، عَوَز
nedostateknouze
fattigdom
skortur
grūtībastrūkums

privation

[praɪˈveɪʃən] N
1. (= poverty) → miseria f, estrechez f
to live in privationvivir en la miseria
2. (= hardship, deprivation) → privación f
to suffer many privationspasar muchos apuros

privation

[praɪˈveɪʃən] n (= hardship) → privations fpl
to endure privation → endurer des privations

privation

n
(= state)Armut f, → Not f; a life of privationein Leben in Armut or Not
(= hardship)Entbehrung f, → Einschränkung f; to suffer many privationsviele Entbehrungen erleiden; wartime privationsdie Entbehrungen plder Kriegszeit

privation

[praɪˈveɪʃn] n
a. (state) → privazione f
b. (hardship) → privazioni fpl, stenti mpl

privation

(praiˈveiʃən) noun
poverty; hardship.

privation

n. privación, necesidad.
References in classic literature ?
We say that that is capable of some particular faculty or possession has suffered privation when the faculty or possession in question is in no way present in that in which, and at the time at which, it should naturally be present.
In burned and devastated Moscow Pierre experienced almost the extreme limits of privation a man can endure; but thanks to his physical strength and health, of which he had till then been unconscious, and thanks especially to the fact that the privations came so gradually that it was impossible to say when they began, he endured his position not only lightly but joyfully.
And Nancy's deepest wounds had all come from the perception that the absence of children from their hearth was dwelt on in her husband's mind as a privation to which he could not reconcile himself.
In the stress of privation and the need of effort I might sometimes forget the somber secret ever baffling the conjecture that it compels.
There he heard of the death of Richardson, who had succumbed to fatigue and privation.
Other losses, although not at first felt, tell heavily after a period: these are the want of room, of seclusion, of rest; the jading feeling of constant hurry; the privation of small luxuries, the loss of domestic society and even of music and the other pleasures of imagination.
But, had it been the beginning of some great labour with the same end in view--had it been the commencement of a long journey, to be performed on foot in that inclement season of the year, to be pursued under very privation and difficulty, and to be achieved only with great distress, fatigue, and suffering--had it been the dawn of some painful enterprise, certain to task his utmost powers of resolution and endurance, and to need his utmost fortitude, but only likely to end, if happily achieved, in good fortune and delight to Nell--Kit's cheerful zeal would have been as highly roused: Kit's ardour and impatience would have been, at least, the same.
THIS is not the place to commemorate the trials and privations endured by the immigrant Mormons before they came to their final haven.
gunboat "Myrtle," and the story of their terrible privations has become quite as well known as the far more horrible "Medusa" case.
Yes, good Makar Alexievitch, I really cannot accept your presents, for I know what they must have cost you--I know to what privations and self-denial they must have led.
He is a Belgian, has been wounded and evidently subjected to great privations.
Most of the clerks were young men of good families, from the Highlands of Scotland, characterized by the perseverance, thrift, and fidelity of their country, and fitted by their native hardihood to encounter the rigorous climate of the North, and to endure the trials and privations of their lot; though it must not be concealed that the constitutions of many of them became impaired by the hardships of the wilderness, and their stomachs injured by occasional famishing, and especially by the want of bread and salt.