privilege


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

priv·i·lege

 (prĭv′ə-lĭj, prĭv′lĭj)
n.
1.
a. A special advantage, immunity, permission, right, or benefit granted to or enjoyed by an individual, class, or caste. See Synonyms at right.
b. Such an advantage, immunity, or right held as a prerogative of status or rank, and exercised to the exclusion or detriment of others.
2. The principle of granting and maintaining a special right or immunity: a society based on privilege.
3.
a. Protection from being forced to disclose confidential communications in certain relationships, as between attorney and client, physician and patient, or priest and confessor.
b. Protection from being sued for libel or slander for making otherwise actionable statements in a context or forum where open and candid expression is deemed desirable for reasons of public policy.
4. An option to buy or sell a stock, including put, call, spread, and straddle.
tr.v. priv·i·leged, priv·i·leg·ing, priv·i·leg·es
1. To grant a privilege to.
2. To free or exempt.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin prīvilēgium, a law affecting one person : prīvus, single, alone; see per in Indo-European roots + lēx, lēg-, law; see leg- in Indo-European roots.]

privilege

(ˈprɪvɪlɪdʒ)
n
1. a benefit, immunity, etc, granted under certain conditions
2. the advantages and immunities enjoyed by a small usually powerful group or class, esp to the disadvantage of others: one of the obstacles to social harmony is privilege.
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) any of the fundamental rights guaranteed to the citizens of a country by its constitution
4. (Law)
a. the right of a lawyer to refuse to divulge information obtained in confidence from a client
b. the right claimed by any of certain other functionaries to refuse to divulge information: executive privilege.
5. (Parliamentary Procedure) the rights and immunities enjoyed by members of most legislative bodies, such as freedom of speech, freedom from arrest in civil cases during a session, etc
6. (Stock Exchange) stock exchange US a speculative contract permitting its purchaser to make optional purchases or sales of securities at a specified time over a limited period of time. See also call61, put20, spread24c, straddle9
vb (tr)
7. to bestow a privilege or privileges upon
8. (foll by from) to free or exempt
[C12: from Old French privilēge, from Latin prīvilēgium law relevant to rights of an individual, from prīvus an individual + lēx law]

priv•i•lege

(ˈprɪv ə lɪdʒ, ˈprɪv lɪdʒ)

n., v. -leged, -leg•ing. n.
1. a right, immunity, or benefit enjoyed by a particular person or a restricted group of persons.
2. a special right, immunity, or exemption granted to persons in authority or office to free them from certain obligations or liabilities.
3. a grant of a special right or immunity, under certain conditions.
4. the principle or condition of enjoying special rights or immunities.
5. any of the rights common to all citizens under a modern constitutional government.
6. an advantage or source of pleasure granted to a person: It's my privilege to be here.
v.t.
7. to grant a privilege to.
8. to exempt (usu. fol. by from).
9. to authorize or license (something otherwise forbidden).
[1125–75; Middle English; earlier privilegie (< Old French privilege) < Latin prīvilēgium orig., a law for or against an individual =prīvi- (comb. form of prīvus one's own) + lēg- (see legal) + -ium -ium1]
syn: privilege, prerogative refer to a special advantage or right possessed by an individual or group. A privilege is a right or advantage gained by birth, social position, effort, or concession. It can have either legal or personal sanction: the privilege of paying half fare; the privilege of calling whenever one wishes. prerogative refers to an exclusive right claimed and granted, often officially or legally, on the basis of social status, heritage, sex, etc.: the prerogatives of a king; the prerogatives of management.

privilege

  • box social - A social event at which boxes of food are auctioned to male bidders, who win the privilege of eating and dancing with the woman who prepared the box lunch.
  • privilege, prerogative - A privilege is a right that may be extended to a group or a number of people; a prerogative is a right that, customarily, is vested in a single person.
  • munity - A granted right or privilege.
  • prerogative - Comes from Latin praerogare, "ask before others," and came to mean "right to precedence, privilege."

privilege


Past participle: privileged
Gerund: privileging

Imperative
privilege
privilege
Present
I privilege
you privilege
he/she/it privileges
we privilege
you privilege
they privilege
Preterite
I privileged
you privileged
he/she/it privileged
we privileged
you privileged
they privileged
Present Continuous
I am privileging
you are privileging
he/she/it is privileging
we are privileging
you are privileging
they are privileging
Present Perfect
I have privileged
you have privileged
he/she/it has privileged
we have privileged
you have privileged
they have privileged
Past Continuous
I was privileging
you were privileging
he/she/it was privileging
we were privileging
you were privileging
they were privileging
Past Perfect
I had privileged
you had privileged
he/she/it had privileged
we had privileged
you had privileged
they had privileged
Future
I will privilege
you will privilege
he/she/it will privilege
we will privilege
you will privilege
they will privilege
Future Perfect
I will have privileged
you will have privileged
he/she/it will have privileged
we will have privileged
you will have privileged
they will have privileged
Future Continuous
I will be privileging
you will be privileging
he/she/it will be privileging
we will be privileging
you will be privileging
they will be privileging
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been privileging
you have been privileging
he/she/it has been privileging
we have been privileging
you have been privileging
they have been privileging
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been privileging
you will have been privileging
he/she/it will have been privileging
we will have been privileging
you will have been privileging
they will have been privileging
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been privileging
you had been privileging
he/she/it had been privileging
we had been privileging
you had been privileging
they had been privileging
Conditional
I would privilege
you would privilege
he/she/it would privilege
we would privilege
you would privilege
they would privilege
Past Conditional
I would have privileged
you would have privileged
he/she/it would have privileged
we would have privileged
you would have privileged
they would have privileged
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.privilege - a special advantage or immunity or benefit not enjoyed by all
advantage, vantage - the quality of having a superior or more favorable position; "the experience gave him the advantage over me"
2.privilege - a right reserved exclusively by a particular person or group (especially a hereditary or official right); "suffrage was the prerogative of white adult males"
right - an abstract idea of that which is due to a person or governmental body by law or tradition or nature; "they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights"; "Certain rights can never be granted to the government but must be kept in the hands of the people"- Eleanor Roosevelt; "a right is not something that somebody gives you; it is something that nobody can take away"
easement - (law) the privilege of using something that is not your own (as using another's land as a right of way to your own land)
privilege of the floor - the right to be admitted onto the floor of a legislative assembly while it is in session
3.privilege - (law) the right to refuse to divulge information obtained in a confidential relationship
right - an abstract idea of that which is due to a person or governmental body by law or tradition or nature; "they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights"; "Certain rights can never be granted to the government but must be kept in the hands of the people"- Eleanor Roosevelt; "a right is not something that somebody gives you; it is something that nobody can take away"
attorney-client privilege - the right of a lawyer to refuse to divulge confidential information from his client
informer's privilege - the right of the government to refuse to reveal the identity of an informer
journalist's privilege - the right of a journalist to refuse to divulge sources of confidential information
husband-wife privilege, marital communications privilege - neither spouse can divulge confidential communications from the other while they were married
physician-patient privilege - the right of a physician to refuse to divulge confidential information from a patient without the consent of the patient
priest-penitent privilege - the right of a clergyman to refuse to divulge confidential information received from a person during confession or similar exchanges
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
Verb1.privilege - bestow a privilege upon
countenance, permit, allow, let - consent to, give permission; "She permitted her son to visit her estranged husband"; "I won't let the police search her basement"; "I cannot allow you to see your exam"

privilege

noun
1. right, benefit, due, advantage, claim, freedom, sanction, liberty, concession, franchise, entitlement, prerogative, birthright The ancient powers and privileges of the House of Commons.
2. advantage, luxury, indulgence, affluence She was born into a life of privilege.
3. honour, pleasure, source of pleasure or pride or satisfaction It's been a privilege to meet you.
4. immunity, liberty, exemption, dispensation He will use parliamentary privilege to make this information public.
verb
1. favour, promote, spoil, side with, advance, smile upon, pull strings for, treat with partiality They are privileging a tiny number to the disadvantage of the rest.
Translations
إمْتِيازاِمْتِيَاز
výsadaprávoprivilegium
privilegium
etuoikeus
privilegijaprivilegij
előny
forréttindi
特権
특권
lengvataprivilegijaprivilegijuotas
priekšrocībaprivilēģija
posebna pravicaprivilegij
privilegium
อภิสิทธิ์
đặc ân

privilege

[ˈprɪvɪlɪdʒ]
A. N
1. (= prerogative) → privilegio m (Jur, Parl) → inmunidad f
members enjoy special privilegeslos miembros gozan de privilegios especiales
as the oldest son, he has certain privilegescomo hijo mayor tiene ciertos privilegios
that's your privilegeestás en tu derecho
to have parliamentary privilegegozar de inmunidad parlamentaria
2. (= honour) → privilegio m, honor m
I had the privilege of meeting hertuve el privilegio or el honor de conocerla
B. VT
1. (= favour) → privilegiar
2. to be privileged to do sthtener el privilegio or el honor de hacer algo
I am privileged to call him a friendtengo el privilegio or el honor de poder decir que es amigo mío

privilege

[ˈprɪvəlɪdʒ]
n
(= advantage) → privilège m
(= honour) → privilège m
It was a privilege to work with such a great actress → C'était un privilège que de travailler avec une aussi grande actrice.
vt (= favour) → privilégier

privilege

n
(= prerogative)Privileg nt, → Sonderrecht nt; (= honour)Ehre f; (Parl) → Immunität f; it’s a lady’s privilegees ist das Vorrecht einer Dame
(Comput) → Zugriffsrecht nt
vtprivilegieren, bevorrechtigen

privilege

[ˈprɪvɪlɪdʒ]
1. nprivilegio (Parliament) → prerogativa
I had the privilege of meeting her → ho avuto il privilegio or l'onore di incontrarla
2. vt to be privileged to do sthavere il privilegio or l'onore di fare qc

privilege

(ˈprivəlidʒ) noun
(a) favour or right available, or granted, to only one person, or to a small number of people. Senior students are usually allowed certain privileges.
ˈprivileged adjective

privilege

اِمْتِيَاز privilegium privilegium Privileg προνόμιο privilegio etuoikeus privilège privilegija privilegio 特権 특권 privilege privilegium przywilej privilégio привилегия privilegium อภิสิทธิ์ ayrıcalık đặc ân 特权

privilege

n. privilegio, derecho.
References in classic literature ?
They availed themselves of the rare privilege to the fullest extent, for some tried the pleasing experiment of drinking mild while standing on their heads, others lent a charm to leapfrog by eating pie in the pauses of the game, cookies were sown broadcast over the field, and apple turnovers roosted in the trees like a new style of bird.
Pontellier had the privilege of quitting their society when they ceased to be entertaining.
You appear to possess the privilege of a casting vote," returned Heyward; "we are three, while you have consulted no one but yourself.
His home would include the home of the dead and buried wizard, and would thus afford the ghost of the latter a kind of privilege to haunt its new apartments, and the chambers into which future bridegrooms were to lead their brides, and where children of the Pyncheon blood were to be born.
She herself had seen nothing, not the shadow of a shadow, and nobody in the house but the governess was in the governess's plight; yet she accepted without directly impugning my sanity the truth as I gave it to her, and ended by showing me, on this ground, an awestricken tenderness, an expression of the sense of my more than questionable privilege, of which the very breath has remained with me as that of the sweetest of human charities.
Let them talk of their oriental summer climes of everlasting conservatories; give me the privilege of making my own summer with my own coals.
Yes, Captain Boomer, if you are quick enough about it, and have a mind to pawn one arm for the sake of the privilege of giving decent burial to the other, why in that case the arm is yours; only let the whale have another chance at you shortly, that's all.
Into it he drops a sum of money--a dollar, or perhaps five dollars, according to his power, and his estimate of the value of the privilege.
So now she is Corporal-General of the Seventh Cavalry, and Flag-Lieutenant of the Ninth Dragoons, with the privilege (decreed by the men) of writing U.
They show that the duel has a singular fascination about it somewhere, for these free men, so far from resting upon the privilege of the badge, are always volunteering.
The white child's name was Thomas a Becket Driscoll, the other's name was Valet de Chambre: no surname--slaves hadn't the privilege.
There are wealthy gentlemen in England who drive four-horse passenger- coaches twenty or thirty miles on a daily line, in the summer, because the privilege costs them considerable money; but if they were offered wages for the service, that would turn it into work and then they would resign.