References in classic literature ?
During the next fifteen minutes she looked more like a rose than ever, for everyone availed themselves of their privileges to the fullest extent, from Mr.
He is my brother's most intimate associate and often fancies that he is entitled to the same privileges as the family.
I am not a prejudiced man, nor one who vaunts himself on his natural privileges, though the worst enemy I have on earth, and he is an Iroquois, daren't deny that I am genuine white," the scout replied, surveying, with secret satisfaction, the faded color of his bony and sinewy hand, "and I am willing to own that my people have many ways, of which, as an honest man, I can't approve.
Among other good-for-nothing properties and privileges, one was especially assigned them,--that of exercising an influence over people's dreams.
It was perceived, too, that while Hester never put forward even the humblest title to share in the world's privileges -- further than to breathe the common air and earn daily bread for little Pearl and herself by the faithful labour of her hands -- she was quick to acknowledge her sisterhood with the race of man whenever benefits were to be conferred.
But not only did each of these famous whales enjoy great individual celebrity --nay, you may call it an ocean-wide renown; not only was he famous in life and now is immortal in forecastle stories after death, but he was admitted into all the rights, privileges, and distinctions of a name; had as much a name indeed as Cambyses or Caesar.
But they have their privileges, as they call them, and I go without.
On fair nights he would sleep in the park or on a truck or an empty barrel or box, and when it was rainy or cold he would stow himself upon a shelf in a ten-cent lodginghouse, or pay three cents for the privileges of a "squatter" in a tenement hallway.
Ah, Mas'r George, you doesn't know half 'your privileges in yer family and bringin' up
I asked them if they supposed a nation of people ever existed, who, with a free vote in every man's hand, would elect that a single family and its descendants should reign over it forever, whether gifted or boobies, to the exclusion of all other families -- including the voter's; and would also elect that a certain hundred families should be raised to dizzy summits of rank, and clothed on with offensive trans- missible glories and privileges to the exclusion of the rest of the nation's families -- INCLUDING HIS OWN.
He merely pays a trifling fee of five or ten dollars, receives a card entitling him to the privileges of the university, and that is the end of it.
There are limits to the privileges of the elect, even in heaven.