pro-British

pro-British

adj
in favour of or supporting Britain, its people, culture, etc
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He will say: "What's pro-British about ministers whose police cuts are so severe that, as senior officers have warned, they are expected to 'reduce very significantly' the ability to respond to a Paris-style attack?
Iraq was then pro-British as the young King Faisal was on the throne and the Iraqi government supported the British.
Robinson's Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), the main pro-British party, has yet to commit to the negotiations until it is satisfied they will deal with paramilitary activities linked to Sinn Fein, their nationalist partner in government, who were formerly the political wing of the IRA.
The arrest on Wednesday of a senior member of Sinn Fein, the political wing of Pira and a partner in the power-sharing government that rules the British province, has brought the administration to the point of collapse, with pro-British Unionists threatening to walk out of the administration.
He added: "The thing that irritates me the most is that somehow you can't be pro-independence and pro-British.
The pro-British Kurds are our best allies and we should not let them down.
He dismisses the tendency to portray an aberrational "eruption of hatred and prejudice," making the case instead for a Klan infused with a very mainstream pro-British nationalism, a vehicle for the expression of "a somewhat more extreme version of what most people thought.
I think we confounded the world by him, a pro-British, pro-Unionist politician, being able to work in a positive spirit with myself, an Irish Republican," said former Irish Republican Army commander Martin McGuinness, who became Paisley's deputy.
The Cherry very soon proved itself in a marketplace that was still very pro-British and paved the way for a larger second series a couple of years later.
During his tenure, the Maulana made great efforts for the promotion of Muslim culture, and that is why his activities were often monitored by pro-British elements in the government.
Chambers concludes by noting that the newsreels were "essentially pro-British and pro-establishment in outlook," and observing, rightly so, that the political complexity of Irish-British relations was never present in the newsreels.
Prof Toye said that Churchill's famous "We shall fight them on the beaches" speech of June 1940 was influenced by William Philip Simms, the pro-British foreign editor of the Scripps-Howard chain of American newspapers.