probabiliorism


Also found in: Wikipedia.

probabiliorism

(ˌprɒbəˈbɪlɪəˌrɪzəm)
n
(Philosophy) the theory that in the case of doubt one should choose the action most likely to be right
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Probabiliorism (from the Latin, 'more likely') argues that one should adopt a position that had a preponderance of evidence on its side.
While probabilism favoured liberty (lex dubio non obligot), probabiliorism held that where there are two opinions, one supporting liberty and the other favouring the law, if the latter is the more probable one, it must be followed.
However, in the years of 1754 and 1755 and in the political context of the Seven Years' War, a series of events occurred which gradually inclined the Bourbon government to use regalism to favor anti-Jesuits (those that espoused the doctrine of probabiliorism which opposed Jesuit probabilism) and a new social class of manteistas, university-educated men of the lower nobility who had been excluded from the Jesuit-run colegios mayores and resented their strong influence.
For clerics and laymen, being a good patriot was to be an advocate of Thomism and probabiliorism, or at least an enemy of probabilism or Molinism.
The aura of probabiliorism evoked by his casuistic approach encourages readers to resolve this moral dilemma by approving the "most probable" response (morally speaking), but since Spenser has framed the matter as a choice between misplaced compassion that results in negligent inaction, or unfortunate violence that cultivates superior morality and civility, the reader is pressured to agree with Irenius.
11) Julia Fleming is less bothered by contemporary debates and offers wise counsel: "Anyone nonplussed by the recent 'method wars' can take comfort in the fact that moral dispute was not a twentieth-century invention, as the exchanges concerning Jansenism, laxism, probabilism, and probabiliorism copiously demonstrate.