probable cause


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probable cause

n. Law
1. Reasonable suspicion of the presence of evidence of criminality, allowing the search of the person or premises for such evidence by authorities.
2. Reasonable grounds for believing a person is guilty of a criminal act, allowing the arrest, prosecution, or trial of such person.

probable cause

n
(Law) law reasonable grounds for holding a belief, esp such as will justify bringing legal proceedings against a person or will constitute a defence to a charge of malicious prosecution

prob′able cause′



n.
1. reasonable ground for a belief that the accused was guilty of the crime.
2. the probability that grounds for the action existed: often used as a defense.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.probable cause - (law) evidence sufficient to warrant an arrest or search and seizure; "a magistrate determined that there was probable cause to search the house"
evidence, grounds - your basis for belief or disbelief; knowledge on which to base belief; "the evidence that smoking causes lung cancer is very compelling"
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
Translations

probable cause

n (US Jur) → hinreichender (Tat)verdacht
References in classic literature ?
The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.
The previous chapter gave account of an immense body or herd of Sperm Whales, and there was also then given the probable cause inducing those vast aggregations.
Another inquest was held: another post-mortem examination failed to reveal a probable cause of death.
She had too old a regard for him to be so wholly estranged as might in two meetings extinguish every past hope, and leave him nothing to do but to keep away from Uppercross: but there was such a change as became very alarming, when such a man as Captain Wentworth was to be regarded as the probable cause.
And as Miss La Creevy walked along, revolving in her mind various genteel forms and elegant turns of expression, with a view to the selection of the very best in which to couch her communication, she cogitated a good deal upon the probable causes of her young friend's indisposition.
In order to arrest somebody in the United States, the Supreme Court has made clear that there must be individualized probable cause to believe that a particular person actually committed a crime.
that probable cause be analyzed in an adversarial proceeding that must
Stick, the top lawyer for the state's Health and Human Services Commission, contends the officer who arrested him after a traffic stop in 2012 lacked probable cause.
Susan Garsh said in her ruling Thursday that probable cause, and a defendant's guilt, can be established by circumstantial evidence, and prosecutors don't need to prove a motive to secure a murder conviction.
While the situation described above is a circumstance that police officers conducting traffic stops might face on a regular basis, (6) federal courts have not resolved the extent to which an officer has probable cause to arrest passengers.
15) Critics have argued for moving these protections up a notch, that is, for example, to require probable cause for all government access to stored e-mail content.
In many (if not most) cases, this was done without proof amounting to probable cause either with no judicial scrutiny or judicial scrutiny that was pro forma at best.

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