proclaim


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pro·claim

 (prō-klām′, prə-)
tr.v. pro·claimed, pro·claim·ing, pro·claims
1. To announce officially and publicly; declare: proclaim a general amnesty for political prisoners; proclaim the suspect to be guilty. See Synonyms at announce.
2. To state emphatically or authoritatively; affirm: proclaim one's opposition to an idea.
3. To indicate conspicuously; make plain: "A painted longbow jutting over his shoulder proclaimed his profession" (Arthur Conan Doyle).

[Middle English proclamen, proclaimen (influenced by claimen, to claim), from Old French proclamer, from Latin prōclāmāre : prō-, forward; see pro-1 + clāmāre, to cry out; see kelə- in Indo-European roots.]

pro·claim′er n.
pro·clam′a·to′ry (prō-klăm′ə-tôr′ē) adj.

proclaim

(prəˈkleɪm)
vb (tr)
1. (may take a clause as object) to announce publicly
2. (may take a clause as object) to show or indicate plainly
3. to praise or extol
[C14: from Latin prōclāmāre to shout aloud]
proˈclaimer n
proclamation n
proclamatory adj

pro•claim

(proʊˈkleɪm, prə-)

v.t.
1. to announce or declare officially or formally.
2. to announce or declare in an open or ostentatious way.
3. to indicate or make known publicly or openly.
4. to extol or praise publicly.
5. to denounce or prohibit publicly.
v.i.
6. to make a proclamation.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin prōclāmāre to cry out. See pro-1, claim]
pro•claim′er, n.
syn: See announce.

proclaim


Past participle: proclaimed
Gerund: proclaiming

Imperative
proclaim
proclaim
Present
I proclaim
you proclaim
he/she/it proclaims
we proclaim
you proclaim
they proclaim
Preterite
I proclaimed
you proclaimed
he/she/it proclaimed
we proclaimed
you proclaimed
they proclaimed
Present Continuous
I am proclaiming
you are proclaiming
he/she/it is proclaiming
we are proclaiming
you are proclaiming
they are proclaiming
Present Perfect
I have proclaimed
you have proclaimed
he/she/it has proclaimed
we have proclaimed
you have proclaimed
they have proclaimed
Past Continuous
I was proclaiming
you were proclaiming
he/she/it was proclaiming
we were proclaiming
you were proclaiming
they were proclaiming
Past Perfect
I had proclaimed
you had proclaimed
he/she/it had proclaimed
we had proclaimed
you had proclaimed
they had proclaimed
Future
I will proclaim
you will proclaim
he/she/it will proclaim
we will proclaim
you will proclaim
they will proclaim
Future Perfect
I will have proclaimed
you will have proclaimed
he/she/it will have proclaimed
we will have proclaimed
you will have proclaimed
they will have proclaimed
Future Continuous
I will be proclaiming
you will be proclaiming
he/she/it will be proclaiming
we will be proclaiming
you will be proclaiming
they will be proclaiming
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been proclaiming
you have been proclaiming
he/she/it has been proclaiming
we have been proclaiming
you have been proclaiming
they have been proclaiming
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been proclaiming
you will have been proclaiming
he/she/it will have been proclaiming
we will have been proclaiming
you will have been proclaiming
they will have been proclaiming
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been proclaiming
you had been proclaiming
he/she/it had been proclaiming
we had been proclaiming
you had been proclaiming
they had been proclaiming
Conditional
I would proclaim
you would proclaim
he/she/it would proclaim
we would proclaim
you would proclaim
they would proclaim
Past Conditional
I would have proclaimed
you would have proclaimed
he/she/it would have proclaimed
we would have proclaimed
you would have proclaimed
they would have proclaimed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.proclaim - declare formally; declare someone to be something; of titles; "He was proclaimed King"
title, entitle - give a title to
2.proclaim - state or announce; "`I am not a Communist,' he exclaimed"; "The King will proclaim an amnesty"
declare - proclaim one's support, sympathy, or opinion for or against; "His wife declared at once for moving to the West Coast"
trumpet - proclaim on, or as if on, a trumpet; "Liberals like to trumpet their opposition to the death penalty"
clarion - proclaim on, or as if on, a clarion
declare - state emphatically and authoritatively; "He declared that he needed more money to carry out the task he was charged with"
3.proclaim - affirm or declare as an attribute or quality of; "The speech predicated the fitness of the candidate to be President"
assert, asseverate, maintain - state categorically
4.proclaim - praise, glorify, or honor; "extol the virtues of one's children"; "glorify one's spouse's cooking"
praise - express approval of; "The parents praised their children for their academic performance"
canonise, canonize - treat as a sacred person; "He canonizes women"
ensky - exalt to the skies; lift to the skies or to heaven with praise
crack up - rhapsodize about
hymn - praise by singing a hymn; "They hymned their love of God"

proclaim

verb
1. announce, declare, advertise, show, publish, indicate, blaze (abroad), herald, circulate, trumpet, affirm, give out, profess, promulgate, make known, enunciate, blazon (abroad), shout from the housetops (informal) He continues to proclaim his innocence.
announce conceal, suppress, withhold, keep secret, keep back, hush up
2. pronounce, announce, declare He launched a coup and proclaimed himself president.

proclaim

verb
1. To bring to public notice or make known publicly:
2. To make known the presence or arrival of:
3. To make manifest or apparent:
Translations
يُعْلِن، يُشْهِر
prohlásit
proklamereudråbe
kihirdet
lÿsa yfir, tilkynna
kreipimasisproklamacija
pasludinātproklamēt
bildirmekilân etmek

proclaim

[prəˈkleɪm] VT
1. (= announce) [+ independence] → proclamar, declarar
to proclaim sb kingproclamar a algn rey
to proclaim one's innocencedeclararse inocente
to proclaim one's loyalty to sbdeclararse leal a algn
to proclaim one's support for sbdeclarar que se apoya a algn
2. (= reveal) → revelar, anunciar
their faces proclaimed their guiltsu culpabilidad se revelaba en las caras

proclaim

[prəˈkleɪm] vt
[+ independence, republic] → proclamer
(= say) → proclamer
to proclaim that ... → proclamer que ...
to proclaim o.s. sth → se proclamer qch

proclaim

vt
(= announce)erklären; revolutionausrufen; to proclaim somebody kingjdn zum König erklären or ausrufen or proklamieren; the day had been proclaimed a holidayder Tag war zum Feiertag erklärt worden; it was proclaimed a successes wurde zu einem Erfolg erklärt
(= reveal)verraten, beweisen
vr to proclaim oneself kingsich zum König erklären

proclaim

[prəˈkleɪm] vt
a. (gen) → proclamare, dichiarare; (peace, public holiday) → dichiarare
to proclaim sb king/that → proclamare qn re/che
b. (fig) (reveal) → dimostrare, rivelare

proclaim

(prəˈkleim) , ((American) prou-) verb
to announce or state publicly. He was proclaimed the winner.
proclaˈmation (proklə-) noun
1. an official, usually ceremonial, announcement made to the public. a royal proclamation.
2. the act of proclaiming.
References in classic literature ?
It would seem that the Being that gave them power to improve His gifts so well, would not deny them voices to proclaim His praise.
Go on, my dear friend, till you, and those who, like you, have been saved, so as by fire, from the dark prison- house, shall stereotype these free, illegal pulses into statutes; and New England, cutting loose from a blood-stained Union, shall glory in being the house of refuge for the oppressed,--till we no longer merely "~hide~ the outcast," or make a merit of standing idly by while he is hunted in our midst; but, consecrat- ing anew the soil of the Pilgrims as an asylum for the oppressed, proclaim our WELCOME to the slave so loudly, that the tones shall reach every hut in the Carolinas, and make the broken-hearted bondman leap up at the thought of old Massachusetts.
Their favour increased; they could not be spared; Sir John would not hear of their going; and in spite of their numerous and long arranged engagements in Exeter, in spite of the absolute necessity of returning to fulfill them immediately, which was in full force at the end of every week, they were prevailed on to stay nearly two months at the park, and to assist in the due celebration of that festival which requires a more than ordinary share of private balls and large dinners to proclaim its importance.
she said, 'or I'll proclaim you to the house, and the whole street
Marner's ideas of legal authority were confused, but he felt that he must go and proclaim his loss; and the great people in the village--the clergyman, the constable, and Squire Cass--would make Jem Rodney, or somebody else, deliver up the stolen money.
Mean while the winged Haralds by command Of Sovran power, with awful Ceremony And Trumpets sound throughout the Host proclaim A solemn Councel forthwith to be held At PANDAEMONIUM, the high Capital Of Satan and his Peers: thir summons call'd From every and Band squared Regiment By place or choice the worthiest; they anon With hundreds and with thousands trooping came Attended: all access was throng'd, the Gates And Porches wide, but chief the spacious Hall (Though like a cover'd field, where Champions bold Wont ride in arm'd, and at the Soldans chair Defi'd the best of Panim chivalry To mortal combat or carreer with Lance) Thick swarm'd, both on the ground and in the air, Brusht with the hiss of russling wings.
The Prior of Jorvaulx crossed himself and repeated a pater noster, in which all devoutly joined, excepting the Jew, the Mahomedans, and the Templar; the latter of whom, without vailing his bonnet, or testifying any reverence for the alleged sanctity of the relic, took from his neck a gold chain, which he flung on the board, saying ``Let Prior Aymer hold my pledge and that of this nameless vagrant, in token that when the Knight of Ivanhoe comes within the four seas of Britain, he underlies the challenge of Brian de Bois-Guilbert, which, if he answer not, I will proclaim him as a coward on the walls of every Temple Court in Europe.
That will the herald presently proclaim," answered the King.
How liable would she become not only to their contempt but to their outrage, and how soon would dear-bought experience proclaim that when a people or family so divide, it never fails to be against themselves.
No one now needed to "feel" him; no one mistook his front for his back; all his movements were readily ascertained by his neighbours without the slightest strain on their powers of calculation; no one jostled him, or failed to make way for him; his voice was saved the labour of that exhausting utterance by which we colourless Squares and Pentagons are often forced to proclaim our individuality when we move amid a crowd of ignorant Isosceles.
Mingott's box, to proclaim to the waiting world his engagement to May Welland, and to see her through whatever difficulties her cousin's anomalous situation might involve her in; this impulse had abruptly overruled all scruples and hesitations, and sent him hurrying through the red corridors to the farther side of the house.
Then of a sudden it came to him like a flash that were he to proclaim a great shooting match and offer some grand prize, Robin Hood might be overpersuaded by his spirit to come to the butts; and it was this thought which caused him to cry "Aha