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Related to prodigality: pellucidity


1. Rashly or wastefully extravagant: prodigal expenditures on unneeded weaponry; a prodigal nephew who squandered his inheritance.
2. Giving or given in abundance; lavish or profuse: "the infinite number of organic beings with which the sea of the tropics, so prodigal of life, teems" (Charles Darwin). See Synonyms at profuse.
One who is given to wasteful luxury or extravagance.

[Late Middle English, probably back-formation from Middle English prodigalite, from Old French, from Late Latin prōdigālitās, from Latin prōdigus, prodigal, from prōdigere, to drive away, squander : prōd-, prō-, for, forth; see proud + agere, to drive; see ag- in Indo-European roots.]

prod′i·gal′i·ty (-găl′ĭ-tē) n.
prod′i·gal·ly adv.


(ˌprɒd ɪˈgæl ɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. wasteful extravagance.
2. an instance of this.
3. lavish abundance.
[1300–50; Middle English prodigalite < Late Latin prōdigālitās= Latin prōdig(us) extravagant (adj. derivative of prōdigere to drive out, waste, squander = prod-, variant of prō- pro-1 + -igere, comb. form of agere to act)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.prodigality - the trait of spending extravagantly
improvidence, shortsightedness - a lack of prudence and care by someone in the management of resources
2.prodigality - excessive spending
waste, wastefulness, dissipation - useless or profitless activity; using or expending or consuming thoughtlessly or carelessly; "if the effort brings no compensating gain it is a waste"; "mindless dissipation of natural resources"


إسْراف، تَبْذير


[ˌprɒdɪˈgælɪtɪ] Nprodigalidad f


n (liter)Verschwendungssucht f; (= lavishness)Fülle f, → Üppigkeit f


[ˌprɒdɪˈgælɪtɪ] nprodigalità


(ˈprodigəl) adjective
spending (money etc) too extravagantly; wasteful.
ˈprodigally adverb
ˌprodiˈgality (-ˈgӕ-) noun
the prodigal son
1. a disobedient and irresponsible son who wastes money on a life of pleasure and later returns home to ask for his parents' forgiveness.
2. a person who acts irresponsibly and later regrets it.
References in classic literature ?
He clasped his hands in despair at the picture of pecuniary compulsion which his fancy had conjured up -- his own golden life-blood spouting from him in great jets of prodigality, under the lancet of Mrs.
it no longer bares its bosom with so dazzling a prodigality, for it is many a day since it was uprooted.
Finding, then, that he was unable to resist his propensity, he resolved to divest himself of the instrument and cause of his prodigality and lavishness, to divest himself of wealth, without which Alexander himself would have seemed parsimonious; and so calling us all three aside one day into a room, he addressed us in words somewhat to the following effect:
Can I not, like Pasta, Malibran, Grisi, acquire for myself what you would never have given me, whatever might have been your fortune, a hundred or a hundred and fifty thousand livres per annum, for which I shall be indebted to no one but myself; and which, instead of being given as you gave me those poor twelve thousand francs, with sour looks and reproaches for my prodigality, will be accompanied with acclamations, with bravos, and with flowers?
If we put these three men together, Monsieur Comminges," said Mazarin, "we must double the guard, and we are not rich enough in fighting men to commit such acts of prodigality.
Now commenced a scene of eager competition and wild prodigality at the different encampments.
It grieves me to witness the extravagance that pervades this country,” said the Judge, “where the settlers trifle with the blessings they might enjoy, with the prodigality of successful adventurers.
For avarice dries up the heart, and prodigality drowns it -- is not that so?
On these occasions there was a degree of magnificence of the purse about them, and a peculiar propensity to expenditure at the goldsmith's and jeweler's for rings, chains, brooches, necklaces, jeweled watches, and other rich trinkets, partly for their own wear, partly for presents to their female acquaintances; a gorgeous prodigality, such as was often to be noticed in former times in Southern planters and West India creoles, when flush with the profits of their plantations.
She obeyed like one in a dream, and when she could affix no more he himself tucked a bud or two into her hat, and heaped her basket with others in the prodigality of his bounty.
We wandered, also, through the Grand Trianon and the Petit Trianon, those monuments of royal prodigality, and with histories so mournful--filled, as it is, with souvenirs of Napoleon the First, and three dead kings and as many queens.
The vegetable life does not content itself with casting from the flower or the tree a single seed, but it fills the air and earth with a prodigality of seeds, that, if thousands perish, thousands may plant themselves; that hundreds may come up, that tens may live to maturity; that at least one may replace the parent.