prodigal

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prod·i·gal

 (prŏd′ĭ-gəl)
adj.
1. Rashly or wastefully extravagant: prodigal expenditures on unneeded weaponry; a prodigal nephew who squandered his inheritance.
2. Giving or given in abundance; lavish or profuse: "the infinite number of organic beings with which the sea of the tropics, so prodigal of life, teems" (Charles Darwin). See Synonyms at profuse.
n.
One who is given to wasteful luxury or extravagance.

[Late Middle English, probably back-formation from Middle English prodigalite, from Old French, from Late Latin prōdigālitās, from Latin prōdigus, prodigal, from prōdigere, to drive away, squander : prōd-, prō-, for, forth; see proud + agere, to drive; see ag- in Indo-European roots.]

prod′i·gal′i·ty (-găl′ĭ-tē) n.
prod′i·gal·ly adv.

prodigal

(ˈprɒdɪɡəl)
adj
1. recklessly wasteful or extravagant, as in disposing of goods or money
2. lavish in giving or yielding: prodigal of compliments.
n
a person who spends lavishly or squanders money
[C16: from Medieval Latin prōdigālis wasteful, from Latin prōdigus lavish, from prōdigere to squander, from pro-1 + agere to drive]
ˌprodiˈgality n
ˈprodigally adv

prod•i•gal

(ˈprɒd ɪ gəl)

adj.
1. wastefully or recklessly extravagant.
2. giving or yielding profusely; lavish (usu. fol. by of or with): to be prodigal with money.
3. lavishly abundant; profuse: prodigal resources.
n.
4. a person who spends money or uses resources with wasteful extravagance; wastrel or profligate.
prod′i•gal•ly, adv.
syn: See lavish.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.prodigal - a recklessly extravagant consumer
consumer - a person who uses goods or services
scattergood, spend-all, spendthrift, spender - someone who spends money prodigally
waster, wastrel - someone who dissipates resources self-indulgently
Adj.1.prodigal - recklessly wasteful; "prodigal in their expenditures"
wasteful - tending to squander and waste

prodigal

adjective
2. (often with of) lavish, bountiful, unstinting, unsparing, bounteous, profuse with You are prodigal of both your toil and your talent.
lavish generous, free, liberal, bountiful, open-handed, unstinting

prodigal

adjective
1. Characterized by excessive or imprudent spending:
2. Given to or marked by unrestrained abundance:
noun
A person who spends money or resources wastefully:
Translations
marnotratný
ødsel
hóflaus
atgailaujantis paklydėlisišlaidžiaisūnus paklydėlis
izšķērdīgs

prodigal

[ˈprɒdɪgəl]
A. ADJpródigo
prodigal of (frm) → pródigo con
the prodigal sonel hijo pródigo
B. Ndespilfarrador(a) m/f

prodigal

[ˈprɒdɪgəl] adj (= extravagant) → prodigue
the Prodigal Son → le fils prodigue

prodigal

adjverschwenderisch; to be prodigal of somethingverschwenderisch mit etw umgehen; the prodigal son (Bibl, fig) → der verlorene Sohn
nVerschwender(in) m(f)

prodigal

[ˈprɒdɪgl] adjprodigo/a

prodigal

(ˈprodigəl) adjective
spending (money etc) too extravagantly; wasteful.
ˈprodigally adverb
ˌprodiˈgality (-ˈgӕ-) noun
the prodigal son
1. a disobedient and irresponsible son who wastes money on a life of pleasure and later returns home to ask for his parents' forgiveness.
2. a person who acts irresponsibly and later regrets it.
References in classic literature ?
Only a very faint bending of the head-dress and plumes welcomed Rawdon and his wife, as those prodigals returned to their family.
She is all energy, and spirit, and sunshine, and interest in everybody and everything, and pours out her prodigal love upon every creature that will take it, high or low, Christian or pagan, feathered or furred; and none has declined it to date, and none ever will, I think.
There, Civilization, acting through the subtle medium of the Saucepan, recovered its hold on them; and the admiral's two prodigal sons, when they saw the covers removed, watered at the mouth as copiously as ever.
Once it was the Puritan Fathers who left our coasts," he is recorded to have said; "nowadays it is our Prodigal Sons.
One said, "He is a prodigal and has sold his father's land, and this is his first venture in trading.
The rooks were awake in Randolph Crescent; but the windows looked down, discreetly blinded, on the return of the prodigal.
And Nature, ever prodigal to her lovers, repays their favours in full measure.
We find them, accordingly, hardy, lithe, vigorous, and active; extravagant in word, and thought, and deed; heedless of hardship; daring of danger; prodigal of the present, and thoughtless of the future.
Luxuriant vegetation spread in wild profuseness over this prodigal soil.
For Tahiti is smiling and friendly; it is like a lovely woman graciously prodigal of her charm and beauty; and nothing can be more conciliatory than the entrance into the harbour at Papeete.
The prodigal has returned," she said, holding out her hand.
This must be some prodigal who hath sold his father's land, and would fain live merrily while the money lasts.