prodigy

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prod·i·gy

 (prŏd′ə-jē)
n. pl. prod·i·gies
1. A person with exceptional talents or powers: a math prodigy.
2. An act or event so extraordinary or rare as to inspire wonder: "The Spies performed prodigies of activity in clambering over the rooftops and cutting the streamers that fluttered from the chimneys" (George Orwell).
3. Archaic A portentous sign or event; an omen.

[Middle English prodige, portent, from Latin prōdigium.]

prodigy

(ˈprɒdɪdʒɪ)
n, pl -gies
1. a person, esp a child, of unusual or marvellous talents. Also called: child genius or child prodigy
2. anything that is a cause of wonder and amazement
3. something monstrous or abnormal
4. an archaic word for omen
[C16: from Latin prōdigium an unnatural happening, from pro-1 + -igium, probably from āio I say]

prod•i•gy

(ˈprɒd ɪ dʒi)

n., pl. -gies.
1. a person, esp. a child or young person, having extraordinary talent or ability: a musical prodigy.
2. something that excites wonder or amazement.
3. something abnormal or monstrous.
4. Archaic. something regarded as of prophetic significance.
[1425–75; < Latin prōdigium prophetic sign]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.prodigy - an unusually gifted or intelligent (young) personprodigy - an unusually gifted or intelligent (young) person; someone whose talents excite wonder and admiration; "she is a chess prodigy"
boy wonder - an extremely talented young male person
child prodigy, infant prodigy, wonder child - a prodigy whose talents are recognized at an early age; "Mozart was a child prodigy"
brainiac, genius, mastermind, Einstein, brain - someone who has exceptional intellectual ability and originality; "Mozart was a child genius"; "he's smart but he's no Einstein"
girl wonder - an extremely talented young female person
2.prodigy - a sign of something about to happenprodigy - a sign of something about to happen; "he looked for an omen before going into battle"
augury, foretoken, preindication, sign - an event that is experienced as indicating important things to come; "he hoped it was an augury"; "it was a sign from God"
auspice - a favorable omen
foreboding - an unfavorable omen
death knell - an omen of death or destruction
3.prodigy - an impressive or wonderful example of a particular quality; "the Marines are expected to perform prodigies of valor"
exemplar, good example, example, model - something to be imitated; "an exemplar of success"; "a model of clarity"; "he is the very model of a modern major general"

prodigy

noun genius, talent, wizard, mastermind, whizz (informal), whizz kid (informal), wunderkind, brainbox, child genius, wonder child an 11-year-old chess prodigy

prodigy

noun
One that evokes great surprise and admiration:
Idioms: one for the books, the eighth wonder of the world.
Translations
أُعْجوبَه، آيَه، شَيءٌ رائِع
zázrak
vidunder
enneennusmerkkiihmeihmelapsimalliesimerkki
csodagyerek
undra-
前兆神童驚異
dabas brīnums/retums
underbarn

prodigy

[ˈprɒdɪdʒɪ] Nprodigio m
child prodigy; infant prodigyniño/a m/f prodigio

prodigy

[ˈprɒdɪdʒi] nprodige m

prodigy

nWunder nt; child or infant prodigyWunderkind nt

prodigy

[ˈprɒdɪdʒɪ] nprodigio
child prodigy, infant prodigy → bambino/a prodigio inv

prodigy

(ˈprodidʒi) plural ˈprodigies noun
something strange and wonderful. A very clever child is sometimes called a child prodigy; prodigies of nature.
References in classic literature ?
and Laurie bent like a well-sweep to examine the prodigies.
The talk was all about good and bad hotels, actors and actresses and musical prodigies.
From time to time I dipped into old Sir Thomas Malory's enchanting book, and fed at its rich feast of prodigies and adventures, breathed in the fragrance of its obsolete names, and dreamed again.
Goddard was the mistress of a Schoolnot of a seminary, or an establishment, or any thing which professed, in long sentences of refined nonsense, to combine liberal acquirements with elegant morality, upon new principles and new systemsand where young ladies for enormous pay might be screwed out of health and into vanitybut a real, honest, oldfashioned Boardingschool, where a reasonable quantity of accomplishments were sold at a reasonable price, and where girls might be sent to be out of the way, and scramble themselves into a little education, without any danger of coming back prodigies.
Sometimes the Angel leans over their cradle, as happened to Lotte, and that is how there are little prodigies who play the fiddle at six better than men at fifty, which, you must admit, is very wonderful.