profligacy


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prof·li·gate

 (prŏf′lĭ-gĭt, -gāt′)
adj.
1. Given to or characterized by licentiousness or dissipation: a profligate nightlife.
2. Given to or characterized by reckless waste; wildly extravagant: a profligate spender; the profligate use of water.
n.
A profligate person.

[Latin prōflīgātus, past participle of prōflīgāre, to ruin, cast down : prō-, forward; see pro-1 + -flīgāre, intensive of flīgere, to strike down.]

prof′li·ga·cy (-gə-sē) n.
prof′li·gate·ly adv.

prof•li•ga•cy

(ˈprɒf lɪ gə si)

n.
1. shameless dissoluteness.
2. reckless extravagance.
3. great abundance.
[1730–40]

profligacy

1. dissolute or immoral behavior.
2. reckless and extravagant spending or behavior. — profligate, adj.
See also: Behavior
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.profligacy - the trait of spending extravagantly
improvidence, shortsightedness - a lack of prudence and care by someone in the management of resources
2.profligacy - dissolute indulgence in sensual pleasure
intemperateness, self-indulgence, intemperance - excess in action and immoderate indulgence of bodily appetites, especially in passion or indulgence; "the intemperance of their language"

profligacy

noun
1. extravagance, excess, squandering, waste, recklessness, wastefulness, lavishness, prodigality, improvidence The country's main problem is fiscal profligacy.
2. immorality, depravity, debauchery, abandon, corruption, promiscuity, laxity, dissipation, degeneracy, licentiousness, wantonness, libertinism, dissoluteness, unrestraint His early warnings about sexual profligacy and AIDS now read as eerily prescient.

profligacy

noun
1. Excessive freedom; lack of restraint:
Translations

profligacy

[ˈprɒflɪgəsɪ] N (= dissoluteness) → libertinaje m; (= extravagance) → prodigalidad f, despilfarro m

profligacy

[ˈprɒflɪgəsi] n (= wastefulness) → prodigalité f

profligacy

n (= dissoluteness)Lasterhaftigkeit f, → Verworfenheit f; (= extravagance)Verschwendungssucht f; (= an extravagance)Verschwendung f

profligacy

[ˈprɒflɪgəsɪ] n (debauchery) → dissolutezza; (extravagance) → grande prodigalità
References in classic literature ?
There was the truth of virginity and the truth of passion, the truth of wealth and of poverty, of thrift and of profligacy, of carelessness and abandon.
I shall never allow people to talk before me about wastefulness and profligacy, and so forth, in connexion with that life, any more.
It was after the early supper-time at the Red House, and the entertainment was in that stage when bashfulness itself had passed into easy jollity, when gentlemen, conscious of unusual accomplishments, could at length be prevailed on to dance a hornpipe, and when the Squire preferred talking loudly, scattering snuff, and patting his visitors' backs, to sitting longer at the whist-table--a choice exasperating to uncle Kimble, who, being always volatile in sober business hours, became intense and bitter over cards and brandy, shuffled before his adversary's deal with a glare of suspicion, and turned up a mean trump-card with an air of inexpressible disgust, as if in a world where such things could happen one might as well enter on a course of reckless profligacy.
and the lives of the saints, only to justify thine own license and profligacy, thy crime is like that of him who extracts poison from the most healthful and necessary herbs.
Of the asceticism that deadens the senses, as of the vulgar profligacy that dulls them, it was to know nothing.
The extravagance and general profligacy which he scrupled not to lay at Mr.
The pious missionaries employed by the Roman Catholic Church to convert the Indians, did everything in their power to counteract the profligacy caused and propagated by these men in the heart of the wilderness.
Or, in his reckless course, often verging upon profligacy, if not plunging into its depths, had he been guilty of some deed which made his bosom a prey to the deadlier fangs of remorse?
for with all these symptoms of profligacy at ten years old, she had neither a bad heart nor a bad temper, was seldom stubborn, scarcely ever quarrelsome, and very kind to the little ones, with few interruptions of tyranny; she was moreover noisy and wild, hated confinement and cleanliness, and loved nothing so well in the world as rolling down the green slope at the back of the house.
The entertainment of the proposition of depravity is the last profligacy and profanation.
But at the same time just this aim demands the greatest efforts of us; and so, led astray by pride, losing sight of this aim, we occupy ourselves either with the mystery which in our impurity we are unworthy to receive, or seek the reformation of the human race while ourselves setting an example of baseness and profligacy.
It's because you don't like my way of living," he charged, thinking in his own mind of the sensational joyrides and general profligacy with which the newspapers had credited him--thinking this, and wondering whether or not, in maiden modesty, she would disclaim knowledge of it.