profligate

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prof·li·gate

 (prŏf′lĭ-gĭt, -gāt′)
adj.
1. Given to or characterized by licentiousness or dissipation: a profligate nightlife.
2. Given to or characterized by reckless waste; wildly extravagant: a profligate spender; the profligate use of water.
n.
A profligate person.

[Latin prōflīgātus, past participle of prōflīgāre, to ruin, cast down : prō-, forward; see pro-1 + -flīgāre, intensive of flīgere, to strike down.]

prof′li·ga·cy (-gə-sē) n.
prof′li·gate·ly adv.

profligate

(ˈprɒflɪɡɪt)
adj
1. shamelessly immoral or debauched
2. wildly extravagant or wasteful
n
a profligate person
[C16: from Latin prōflīgātus corrupt, from prōflīgāre to overthrow, from pro-1 + flīgere to beat]
profligacy n
ˈprofligately adv

prof•li•gate

(ˈprɒf lɪ gɪt, -ˌgeɪt)

adj.
1. utterly and shamelessly immoral or dissipated; thoroughly dissolute.
2. recklessly prodigal or extravagant.
n.
3. a profligate person.
[1525–35; < Latin prōflīgātus broken down in character, degraded, orig. past participle of prōflīgāre to shatter, debase =prō- pro-1 + -flīgāre, derivative of flīgere to strike; see inflict, -ate1]
prof′li•gate•ly, adv.

profligate

- To overcome or overthrow.
See also related terms for overcome.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.profligate - a dissolute man in fashionable societyprofligate - a dissolute man in fashionable society
debauchee, libertine, rounder - a dissolute person; usually a man who is morally unrestrained
2.profligate - a recklessly extravagant consumer
consumer - a person who uses goods or services
scattergood, spend-all, spendthrift, spender - someone who spends money prodigally
waster, wastrel - someone who dissipates resources self-indulgently
Adj.1.profligate - recklessly wasteful; "prodigal in their expenditures"
wasteful - tending to squander and waste
2.profligate - unrestrained by convention or morality; "Congreve draws a debauched aristocratic society"; "deplorably dissipated and degraded"; "riotous living"; "fast women"
immoral - deliberately violating accepted principles of right and wrong

profligate

adjective
1. extravagant, reckless, squandering, wasteful, prodigal, spendthrift, immoderate, improvident the most profligate consumer of energy in the world

profligate

adjectivenoun
1. An immoral or licentious person:
2. A person who spends money or resources wastefully:
Translations

profligate

[ˈprɒflɪgɪt]
A. ADJ (= dissolute) → libertino, disoluto; (= extravagant) → despilfarrador, derrochador
B. N (= degenerate) → libertino/a m/f; (= spendthrift) → despilfarrador(a) m/f

profligate

[ˈprɒflɪgət] adj
(= extravagant) [lifestyle, behaviour, spending] → extravagant(e)
profligate with → prodigue de
(= wasteful) profligate use of sth → le gaspillage de qch

profligate

adj (= dissolute)lasterhaft, verworfen; (= extravagant)verschwenderisch
n (= roué)Leichtfuß m, → Liederjan m (inf); (= prodigal)Verschwender(in) m(f)

profligate

[ˈprɒflɪgɪt] adj (dissolute, behaviour, act) → dissipato/a; (000, person) → dissoluto/a
he's very profligate with his money → è uno che sperpera i suoi soldi
References in classic literature ?
A treacherous friend is the most dangerous enemy; and I will say boldly, that both religion and virtue have received more real discredit from hypocrites than the wittiest profligates or infidels could ever cast upon them: nay, farther, as these two, in their purity, are rightly called the bands of civil society, and are indeed the greatest of blessings; so when poisoned and corrupted with fraud, pretence, and affectation, they have become the worst of civil curses, and have enabled men to perpetrate the most cruel mischiefs to their own species.
Sir Mulberry's world was peopled with profligates, and he acted accordingly.
At length it was found necessary to establish fortified posts at the confluence of the rivers and the lakes for the protection of the trade, and the restraint of these profligates of the wilderness.
I cannot say just why I conceived that there was something unhallowed in the matter of the book; perhaps this was a tint from the reputation of the rather profligate young man from whom my father had it.
You have profited by their toil to lead a profligate life.