profoundly


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Related to profoundly: profoundly deaf, Profoundly gifted

pro·found

 (prə-found′, prō-)
adj. pro·found·er, pro·found·est
1. Having, showing, or requiring great insight or understanding: a profound thinker; a profound analysis.
2. Deeply felt or held; intense: profound contempt; a profound conviction.
3. Thoroughgoing; far-reaching: profound social changes.
4. Unqualified or unbroken: a profound silence; profound sleep.
5. Situated at, extending to, or coming from a great depth; deep: a profound chasm.

[Middle English profounde, from Old French profond, deep, from Latin profundus : prō-, before; see pro-1 + fundus, bottom.]

pro·found′ly adv.
pro·found′ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.profoundly - to a great depth psychologically; "They felt the loss deeply"

profoundly

Translations
بِصورَةٍ عَميقَه
hluboce
dybsindigt
djúpt; spaklega

profoundly

[prəˈfaʊndlɪ] ADVprofundamente
I was profoundly affected by her ideas/her deathsus ideas me afectaron/su muerte me afectó profundamente
he apologized profoundly when he discovered his mistakese deshizo en disculpas cuando se dio cuenta de su error
to be profoundly deafser totalmente sordo
I am profoundly grateful to all the people who helped usles estoy profundamente agradecido a todos los que nos ayudaron
people are profoundly ignorant about the lawla gente no sabe absolutamente nada acerca de la legislación

profoundly

[prəˈfaʊndli] adv [influence, affect] → profondément profoundly deafprofoundly deaf adjsourd(e) profond(e)

profoundly

adv differentzutiefst; profoundly sadtieftraurig; profoundly deafvollkommen taub; profoundly significantäußerst bedeutsam; profoundly indifferentvöllig or vollkommen gleichgültig; …, he said profoundly…, sagte er tiefsinnig; to be profoundly ignorant of somethingüberhaupt keine Ahnung von etw haben

profoundly

[prəˈfaʊndlɪ] advprofondamente

profound

(prəˈfaund) adjective
1. deep. profound sleep.
2. showing great knowledge or understanding. a profound remark.
proˈfoundly adverb
proˈfundity (-ˈfan-) noun
References in classic literature ?
She thought that the months she had spent in the city, the going to theaters and the seeing of great crowds wandering in lighted thor- oughfares, had changed her profoundly.
The hard, weather- beaten features of the scout began to work, and when she had ended, he dropped his chin to his hand, like a man musing profoundly on the nature of the proposal.
She retired to her chamber, but did not soon fall asleep, nor then very profoundly.
Dimmesdale had lived; and who might well, therefore, be more profoundly versed in such solid and valuable attainments than their youthful brother.
For, like the Coronation banquet at Frankfort, where the German Emperor profoundly dines with the seven
Long maintaining an enchanted silence, Ahab stood apart; and every time the tetering ship loweringly pitched down her bowsprit, he turned to eye the bright sun's rays produced ahead; and when she profoundly settled by the stern, he turned behind, and saw the sun's rearward place, and how the same yellow rays were blending with his undeviating wake.
Black Sam, as he was commonly called, from his being about three shades blacker than any other son of ebony on the place, was revolving the matter profoundly in all its phases and bearings, with a comprehensiveness of vision and a strict lookout to his own personal well-being, that would have done credit to any white patriot in Washington.
They adopted her, with grave and formal military ceremonies of their own invention - solemnities is the truer word; solemnities that were so profoundly solemn and earnest, that the spectacle would have been comical if it hadn't been so touching.
The next day--that is to say, on the fourth of September--something occurred which profoundly impressed Roxana.
The public were profoundly concerned; they searched high and low, they dragged the river for his body.
Among the teachers at Wareham was one who influenced Rebecca profoundly, Miss Emily Maxwell, with whom she studied English literature and composition.
So profoundly ignorant of the nature of slavery are many persons, that they are stubbornly incredu- lous whenever they read or listen to any recital of the cruelties which are daily inflicted on its victims.