progradation


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progradation

(ˌprəʊɡrəˈdeɪʃən)
n
(Physical Geography) (of shore or shoreline) the advance seawards due to the build up of sediment
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Specimen assemblages variously composed of freshwater, freshwater-tolerant, brackish, and marine taxa indicate mixing on a floodplain with limited sediment accumulation through deltaic progradation or river avulsion as, in part, envisaged by Ludvigson and Witzke (14).
We attribute this change to the progradation of a megafan-like wedge of sediment from the Caledonia Highlands that caused differential loading, trapping of coarse-grained clastics in proximal areas, rapid salt withdrawal, and pronounced uplift of the Minudie Anticline diapir.
Such a sedimentary switch might represent the local progradation of higher energy transverse deposits over lower energy axial or centripetal systems, not a Zagros wide pulse of deformation.
The basin had evolved through a deep foreland basin ('flysch') phase during late Eocene-Oligocene times, followed by post-Oligocene ('molasse') phase of shallow marine shelf progradation to present day.
It was thus concluded that progradation did not alter the shoreline much, at least until the 17th century, when the Japanese began to reclaim the land (Nagata 1994).
The Narva transgression was followed by a regressive southward progradation of tide-dominated deltaic to estuarine deposits that continued through the Middle Devonian, up to the end of the Givetian (Kurss 1992; Kleesment 1997; Plink-Bjorklund & Bjorklund 1999; Ponten & Plink-Bjorklund 2007; Tanavsuu-Milkeviciene & Plink-Bjorklund 2009).
They also concluded that spatial patterns in heavy metals on the surfaces of tidal flats are important because they provide evidence of current contaminant levels, plus historical patterns resulting from the seaward progradation of tidal flat deposits, while Brack (11) and Johannesson, (12) used river bottom sediments to monitor environmental change, historical pollution trends and mapping anthropogenic and natural influences on river and estuarine systems.
Coastal progradation has extended the coastline southward during the last several thousand years; it was fed by deposition from several major river systems draining the highland spine of New Guinea (Swadling & Hope 1992).
The establishment of extensive seagrass meadows led to the rapid accumulation of marine and estuarine sediments, resulting in coastal progradation throughout the late Holocene (Edmonds 1995).
1996) concluded that cyclicity could be explained due to frequent progradation and retreat of what was basically a straight, tide-influenced shoreline onto a storm-dominated marine shelf.
Coastal progradation of this Top End low-energy coast is ongoing today in the context of a climate characterised by two major and clearly delineated seasons--an extended seven-month dry season from May to November, and a wet season from December to April featuring severe storms and cyclones that impact upon the coast.
Catherines Island records episodes of deposition interrupted by erosion spanning more than 3000 years of progradation (based on archaeological data).