prolegomenon


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pro·le·gom·e·non

 (prō′lĭ-gŏm′ə-nŏn′, -nən)
n. pl. pro·le·gom·e·na (-nə)
1. A preliminary discussion, especially a formal essay introducing a work of considerable length or complexity.
2. prolegomena(used with a sing. or pl. verb) Prefatory remarks or observations.

[Greek, from neuter present passive participle of prolegein, to say beforehand : pro-, before; see pro-2 + legein, to speak; see leg- in Indo-European roots.]

pro′le·gom′e·nous adj.

prolegomenon

(ˌprəʊlɛˈɡɒmɪnən)
n, pl -na (-nə)
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) (often plural) a preliminary discussion, esp a formal critical introduction to a lengthy text
[C17: from Greek, from prolegein, from pro-2 + legein to say]
ˌproleˈgomenal, ˌproleˈgomenary, ˌproleˈgomenous adj

pro•le•gom•e•non

(ˌproʊ lɪˈgɒm əˌnɒn, -nən)

n., pl. -na (-nə).
a preliminary or introductory commentary, esp. a scholarly preface or introduction to a book.
[1645–55; < New Latin < Greek prolegómenon, neuter pass. present participle of prolégein to say beforehand]
pro`le•gom′e•nous (-nəs) adj.

prolegomenon

a preliminary rem ark or introduction, as to a speech; the foreword to a book or treatise. — prolegomenary, prolegomenous, adj.
See also: Books
a preliminary remark or introduction, as to a speech; the foreword to a book or treatise. — prolegomenary, prolegomenous, adj.
See also: Rhetoric and Rhetorical Devices
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.prolegomenon - a preliminary discussion inserted at the beginning of a book or treatise
introduction - the first section of a communication

prolegomenon

noun
A short section of preliminary remarks:
References in periodicals archive ?
Among their topics are kaleidoscopic variations on grammatical themes: relative clauses in Bantoid languages of Cameroon, the augment as a construct form marker in Eton relative clause constructions, relative clauses in (Western) Ejagham, a prolegomenon to the syntax of the relative clause in the Eastern Grasslands Bantu borderland, and relative clauses in Vute grammar and discourse.
In the prolegomenon to this book, Edward Feser informs us that his introduction to scholastic metaphysics, while written from a Thomistic point of view, will take into account the views of other major scholastic thinkers, such as Scotus, Suarez, and Ockham.
Maimonides methodically and artfully crafts a list of 613 commandments in a work that serves as a prolegomenon to the Mishneh Torah.
He seeks to understand the nature of African American religion and articulate its complexities, culminating in the final two chapters, which provide a well-formulated prolegomenon for exploring alternative methodology and theory in thinking about the nature of African American religion.
This latest work is--in addition to Questioning Back: the Overcoming of Metaphysics in Christian Theology, and Religious Pluralism and Christian Truth--the third volume of O'Leary's critical trilogy, which he presents as "a quasi-Kantian prolegomenon to any future theology.
The first two sections function as a kind of prolegomenon, considering the questions, what is religion?
The book opens with a long polemical prolegomenon pillorying Israel for being "blinded by hubris and self-righteousness" (p.
The book is basically programmatic, a prolegomenon for the future of bioethics, and like any prolegomenon, it exhibits many blank spaces to be filled in later by others who answer the call for a careful examination of how abusive power relations work in bioethics.
One would have preferred that Clark had waited for a more complete synthesis of genre and approach before offering this prolegomenon.
The concept "horse" paradox and Wittgensteinian conceptual investigations; a prolegomenon to philosophical investigations.
Susan Thorpe writes " In my opinion the resulting word(s) in 'Anacrograms: Prolegomenon to Acrostic Anagrams' should be the initial letters in order or reverse order, as in A DAD 'another day, another dollar' or BACK 'keeps creditors at bay".
More general is a quite dense essay by Christine Maillard on the myth of science in the thought and literature of the time, which looks like a prolegomenon to a larger study.