proletarian

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pro·le·tar·i·an

 (prō′lĭ-târ′ē-ən)
adj.
Of, relating to, or characteristic of the proletariat.
n.
A member of the proletariat; a worker.

[From Latin prōlētārius, belonging to the lowest class of Roman citizens (viewed as contributing to the state only through having children), from prōlēs, offspring; see al- in Indo-European roots.]

pro′le·tar′i·an·ism n.

proletarian

(ˌprəʊlɪˈtɛərɪən) or less commonly

proletary

adj
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) of, relating, or belonging to the proletariat
n, pl -tarians or -taries
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a member of the proletariat
[C17: from Latin prōlētārius one whose only contribution to the state was his offspring, from prōlēs offspring]
ˌproleˈtarianism n
ˌproleˈtarianness n

pro•le•tar•i•an

(ˌproʊ lɪˈtɛər i ən)

adj.
1. pertaining or belonging to the proletariat.
n.
2. a member of the proletariat.
[1835–45]
pro`le•tar′i•an•ism, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.proletarian - a member of the working class (not necessarily employed); "workers of the world--unite!"
labor, labour, proletariat, working class - a social class comprising those who do manual labor or work for wages; "there is a shortage of skilled labor in this field"
common man, common person, commoner - a person who holds no title
dogsbody - a worker who has to do all the unpleasant or boring jobs that no one else wants to do
Adj.1.proletarian - belonging to or characteristic of the proletariat
low-class, lower-class - occupying the lowest socioeconomic position in a society

proletarian

adjective
1. working-class, common, cloth-cap (informal), plebeian the issue of proletarian world solidarity
noun
1. worker, commoner, Joe Bloggs (Brit. informal), pleb, plebeian, prole (derogatory slang, chiefly Brit.) The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains.
Translations
proletářský

proletarian

[ˌprəʊləˈtɛərɪən]
A. ADJproletario
B. Nproletario/a m/f

proletarian

[ˌprəʊlɪˈtɛəriən]
adjprolétarien(ne)
nprolétaire m/f

proletarian

adjproletarisch
nProletarier(in) m(f)

proletarian

[ˌprəʊləˈtɛərɪən] adj & nproletario/a
References in periodicals archive ?
During this time, as Lloyd outlines, the proletarianization of mining and factory labour was accompanied by the formation of "local pride and working-class culture.
To be sure, de Rougemont overreacts to what he grasps as the ravages of proletarianization, that is, the tendency to reduce the hand to the measure of a certain alienation (here he anticipates Arendt's own hesitations regarding labor in The Human Condition), but his discussion also gives us the exact reasons for not making the same mistakes.
This proletarianization of clerical work varied throughout individual contexts and was not an entirely conclusive change from the previous era.
The defeats trade unions suffered again and again for decades before the crisis could not be understood except in terms of the rippling effects of global proletarianization and precaritization amidst shifting sites and sectors of production and distribution.
Coffee and Rural Proletarianization in Puerto Rico, 1840-1898.
William Carroll (1987) followed up on this finding, using special tabulations for the 1981 census to study the proletarianization of women after controlling for occupational segregation.
They focus on teachers as workers in educational organisations, paying close attention to processes of proletarianization and professionalization, and how ideologies of professionalism enable or constrain individual and collective political action.
Land grabs like the proposed Sulphur River projects--or like China's Three Gorges Dam, which sent millions of peasants streaming into the cities--represent proletarianization on an egregious scale.
If Ding's and Yin's texts only hint at how working-class modernity arises from both the experience of proletarianization and the new revolutionary forms of collectivity and activity created in capitalist industrial society, this dual presentation becomes more explicit in several contemporary literary reportage sketches of women factory workers in Shanghai.
78, May, 2000; Pamela Horn, The Rural World 1750-1850: Social Change in the English Countryside, Hutchinson, London, 1980; Jane Humphries, 'Enclosure, Common Rights and Women: The Proletarianization of Women in the late Eighteenth and early Nineteenth Centuries', Journal of Economic History, no.
Instead schools reflected an effort to appropriate the formal means of socialization in the hopes of insuring social stability via the pacification of the African American masses, in addition to their proletarianization and ultimate placement at the lower rungs of the wage labor hierarchy.
As Benjamin observes, "The increasing proletarianization of modern man and the increasing formation of masses are two sides of the same process" ("Work of Art" 120).