promontory

(redirected from promontories)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

prom·on·to·ry

 (prŏm′ən-tôr′ē)
n. pl. prom·on·to·ries
1. A high ridge of land or rock jutting out into a body of water; a headland.
2. Anatomy A projecting part.

[Latin prōmontorium, alteration (influenced by mōns, mont-, mount) of prōmunturium, probably from prōminēre, to jut out; see prominent.]

promontory

(ˈprɒməntərɪ; -trɪ)
n, pl -ries
1. (Physical Geography) a high point of land, esp of rocky coast, that juts out into the sea
2. (Anatomy) anatomy any of various projecting structures
[C16: from Latin prōmunturium headland; related to prōminēre; see prominent]

prom•on•to•ry

(ˈprɒm ənˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i)

n., pl. -ries.
1. a high point of land or rock projecting into water beyond the line of coast; headland.
2. a bluff, or part of a plateau, overlooking a lowland.
3. Anat. a prominent or protuberant part.
[1540–50; < Latin prōmontorium, prōmunturium, of unclear derivation]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.promontory - a natural elevation (especially a rocky one that juts out into the sea)promontory - a natural elevation (especially a rocky one that juts out into the sea)
mull - a term used in Scottish names of promontories; "the Mull of Kintyre"
natural elevation, elevation - a raised or elevated geological formation
point - a promontory extending out into a large body of water; "they sailed south around the point"

promontory

noun point, cape, head, spur, ness (archaic), headland, foreland a promontory jutting out into the bay
Translations
رأس بَحْري، جُرْف
mysostrohútes
forbjerg
niemi
hegyfok
höfîi
zemesrags

promontory

[ˈprɒməntrɪ] Npromontorio m

promontory

[ˈprɒməntəri] npromontoire m

promontory

nVorgebirge nt, → Kap nt

promontory

[ˈprɒməntrɪ] npromontorio

promontory

(ˈproməntəri) plural ˈpromontories noun
a piece of land that projects from the coastline.

prom·on·to·ry

n. promontorio, elevación.
References in classic literature ?
They depend upon local causes - the configuration of coasts, the shapes of straits, the accidents of bold promontories round which they play their little part.
The route of the travellers lay generally along the course of the Nebraska or Platte, but occasionally, where steep promontories advanced to the margin of the stream, they were obliged to make inland circuits.
It had the same long regularly graded retreating slope from above the brows, which were likewise very projecting, like two long promontories thickly wooded on top.