promontory


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

prom·on·to·ry

 (prŏm′ən-tôr′ē)
n. pl. prom·on·to·ries
1. A high ridge of land or rock jutting out into a body of water; a headland.
2. Anatomy A projecting part.

[Latin prōmontorium, alteration (influenced by mōns, mont-, mount) of prōmunturium, probably from prōminēre, to jut out; see prominent.]

promontory

(ˈprɒməntərɪ; -trɪ)
n, pl -ries
1. (Physical Geography) a high point of land, esp of rocky coast, that juts out into the sea
2. (Anatomy) anatomy any of various projecting structures
[C16: from Latin prōmunturium headland; related to prōminēre; see prominent]

prom•on•to•ry

(ˈprɒm ənˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i)

n., pl. -ries.
1. a high point of land or rock projecting into water beyond the line of coast; headland.
2. a bluff, or part of a plateau, overlooking a lowland.
3. Anat. a prominent or protuberant part.
[1540–50; < Latin prōmontorium, prōmunturium, of unclear derivation]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.promontory - a natural elevation (especially a rocky one that juts out into the sea)promontory - a natural elevation (especially a rocky one that juts out into the sea)
mull - a term used in Scottish names of promontories; "the Mull of Kintyre"
natural elevation, elevation - a raised or elevated geological formation
point - a promontory extending out into a large body of water; "they sailed south around the point"

promontory

noun point, cape, head, spur, ness (archaic), headland, foreland a promontory jutting out into the bay
Translations
رأس بَحْري، جُرْف
mysostrohútes
forbjerg
niemi
hegyfok
höfîi
zemesrags

promontory

[ˈprɒməntrɪ] Npromontorio m

promontory

[ˈprɒməntəri] npromontoire m

promontory

nVorgebirge nt, → Kap nt

promontory

[ˈprɒməntrɪ] npromontorio

promontory

(ˈproməntəri) plural ˈpromontories noun
a piece of land that projects from the coastline.

prom·on·to·ry

n. promontorio, elevación.
References in classic literature ?
Here is my promontory, and there is the sea--IT rolleth hither unto me, shaggily and fawningly, the old, faithful, hundred-headed dog-monster that I love
Sometimes the beasts separated to follow their own inclinations for an hour or a day, and it was upon one of these occasions when the ape-man had wandered through the tree-tops toward the beach, and was stretched in the hot sun upon the sand, that from the low summit of a near-by promontory a pair of keen eyes discovered him.
Their house was in Wickham Place, and fairly quiet, for a lofty promontory of buildings separated it from the main thoroughfare.
Again I turned my face to leeward, and again I saw the jutting promontory, black and high and naked, the raging surf that broke about its base and beat its front high up with spouting fountains, the black and forbidden coast-line running toward the south-east and fringed with a tremendous scarf of white.
When I had reached these, and walked over the moist, slippery sea-weed (at the risk of floundering into one of the numerous pools of clear, salt water that lay between them), to a little mossy promontory with the sea splashing round it, I looked back again to see who next was stirring.
He climbed a rock, sloping to a little promontory, and there, with his arms crossed, mute and motionless, and with an eager look, he seemed to take possession of these southern regions.
The mouth of the Columbia is upwards of four miles wide with a peninsula and promontory on one side, and a long low spit of land on the other; between which a sand bar and chain of breakers almost block the entrance.
But Hesiod, the poet, says just the opposite: that the sea was open, but Orion piled up the promontory by Peloris, and founded the close of Poseidon which is especially esteemed by the people thereabouts.
A hollow like a great amphitheatre, full of terraced steps and misty olives, now lay between them and the heights of Fiesole, and the road, still following its curve, was about to sweep on to a promontory which stood out in the plain.
For they are only being driven from promontory to cape; and if one coast is no longer enlivened with their jets, then, be sure, some other and remoter strand has been very recently startled by the unfamiliar spectacle.
It was already clear to be seen that, on the day of the experiment itself, the aggregate of spectators would be counted by millions; for they were already arriving from all parts of the earth upon this narrow strip of promontory.
Beyond a low promontory of what once had been an island the green men were disappearing toward the west.