promontory


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promontory
Cape Point promontory
Cape Town, South Africa

prom·on·to·ry

 (prŏm′ən-tôr′ē)
n. pl. prom·on·to·ries
1. A high ridge of land or rock jutting out into a body of water; a headland.
2. Anatomy A projecting part.

[Latin prōmontorium, alteration (influenced by mōns, mont-, mount) of prōmunturium, probably from prōminēre, to jut out; see prominent.]

promontory

(ˈprɒməntərɪ; -trɪ)
n, pl -ries
1. (Physical Geography) a high point of land, esp of rocky coast, that juts out into the sea
2. (Anatomy) anatomy any of various projecting structures
[C16: from Latin prōmunturium headland; related to prōminēre; see prominent]

prom•on•to•ry

(ˈprɒm ənˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i)

n., pl. -ries.
1. a high point of land or rock projecting into water beyond the line of coast; headland.
2. a bluff, or part of a plateau, overlooking a lowland.
3. Anat. a prominent or protuberant part.
[1540–50; < Latin prōmontorium, prōmunturium, of unclear derivation]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.promontory - a natural elevation (especially a rocky one that juts out into the sea)promontory - a natural elevation (especially a rocky one that juts out into the sea)
mull - a term used in Scottish names of promontories; "the Mull of Kintyre"
natural elevation, elevation - a raised or elevated geological formation
point - a promontory extending out into a large body of water; "they sailed south around the point"

promontory

noun point, cape, head, spur, ness (archaic), headland, foreland a promontory jutting out into the bay
Translations
رأس بَحْري، جُرْف
mysostrohútes
forbjerg
niemi
hegyfok
höfîi
zemesrags

promontory

[ˈprɒməntrɪ] Npromontorio m

promontory

[ˈprɒməntəri] npromontoire m

promontory

nVorgebirge nt, → Kap nt

promontory

[ˈprɒməntrɪ] npromontorio

promontory

(ˈproməntəri) plural ˈpromontories noun
a piece of land that projects from the coastline.

prom·on·to·ry

n. promontorio, elevación.
References in classic literature ?
Those narrow straits of Sunda divide Sumatra from Java; and standing midway in that vast rampart of islands, buttressed by that bold green promontory, known to seamen as Java Head; they not a little correspond to the central gateway opening into some vast walled empire: and considering the inexhaustible wealth of spices, and silks, and jewels, and gold, and ivory, with which the thousand islands of that oriental sea are enriched, it seems a significant provision of nature, that such treasures, by the very formation of the land, should at least bear the appearance, however ineffectual, of being guarded from the all-grasping western world.
I could see the cool green tree-tops swaying together in the breeze, and I felt sure I should make the next promontory without fail.
Meanwhile, the wind having changed we were compelled to head for the land, and ply our oars to avoid being driven on shore; but it was our good fortune to reach a creek that lies on one side of a small promontory or cape, called by the Moors that of the "Cava rumia," which in our language means "the wicked Christian woman;" for it is a tradition among them that La Cava, through whom Spain was lost, lies buried at that spot; "cava" in their language meaning "wicked woman," and "rumia" "Christian;" moreover, they count it unlucky to anchor there when necessity compels them, and they never do so otherwise.
I drew rein on a little level promontory overlooking the trail below and to my left, and saw the party of pursuing savages disappearing around the point of a neighboring peak.
At last came the day that the steamer dropped anchor in the lee of a wooded promontory where a score or more of sheet- iron shacks making an unsightly blot upon the fair face of nature proclaimed the fact that civilization had set its heel.
The 6th of February, the Nautilus floated in sight of Aden, perched upon a promontory which a narrow isthmus joins to the mainland, a kind of inaccessible Gibraltar, the fortifications of which were rebuilt by the English after taking possession in 1839.
We were now within the embrace of a broad bay flanked on either hand by a low promontory.
One of its chiefs, who understood Provencal, begged the commune of Marseilles to give them this bare and barren promontory, where, like the sailors of old, they had run their boats ashore.
Your brother and his ships escaped, for Juno protected him, but when he was just about to reach the high promontory of Malea, he was caught by a heavy gale which carried him out to sea again sorely against his will, and drove him to the foreland where Thyestes used to dwell, but where Aegisthus was then living.
Thus triumphantly did the Argo sail out of the harbor, amidst the huzzas and good wishes of everybody except the wicked old Pelias, who stood on a promontory, scowling at her, and wishing that he could blow out of his lungs the tempest of wrath that was in his heart, and so sink the galley with all on board.
On the north side of the Mohawk, and at about fifty miles from its mouth, is a mountain which, as we have already said, juts, in a nearly perpendicular promontory, into the bed of the river; its inclination is sufficient to admit of its receiving the name of a nose.
Poyser was in his Sunday suit of drab, with a red-and-green waistcoat and a green watch-ribbon having a large cornelian seal attached, pendant like a plumb-line from that promontory where his watch-pocket was situated; a silk handkerchief of a yellow tone round his neck; and excellent grey ribbed stockings, knitted by Mrs.