proneness


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prone

 (prōn)
adj.
1. Lying with the front or face downward.
2. Having a tendency; inclined. Often used in combination: paper that is prone to yellowing; an accident-prone child.
adv.
In a prone manner: The patient was lying prone on the bed.

[Middle English, inclined, disposed, from Latin prōnus, leaning forward; see per in Indo-European roots.]

prone′ly adv.
prone′ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.proneness - being disposed to do something; "accident proneness"
disposition - a natural or acquired habit or characteristic tendency in a person or thing; "a swelling with a disposition to rupture"

proneness

noun
Translations

proneness

[ˈprəʊnnɪs] Npropensión f, predisposición f (to a)

proneness

nNeigung f(to zu)
References in classic literature ?
In the affair of love, which, out of strict conformity with the Stoic philosophy, we shall here treat as a disease, this proneness to relapse is no less conspicuous.
The wandering whites who mingle for any length of time with the savages have invariably a proneness to adopt savage habitudes; but none more so than the free trappers.
In Hester Prynne's instance, however, as not unfrequently in other cases, her sentence bore that she should stand a certain time upon the platform, but without undergoing that gripe about the neck and confinement of the head, the proneness to which was the most devilish characteristic of this ugly engine.
Hitherto, though I saw the old lady had her defects (of which one was a proneness to proclaim her perfections), I had always been wishful to excuse them, and to give her credit for all the virtues she professed, and even imagine others yet untold.
The honest man who had expended the sweat of his brow became uneasy, and began to complain with bitterness of the proneness of mankind to cheat him--him invested with the dignity of Labour!
An unwarranted confidence in the sanctity of its apostles--a proneness to regard them as incapable of guile--and an impatience of the least suspicion to their rectitude as men or Christians, have ever been prevailing faults in the Church.
I was so fearful of this at first, that I humbled myself to intimate to him, in private, my apprehensions of Arthur's proneness to these excesses, and to express a hope that he would not encourage it.
In addition, the results indicate a greater tendency to be mental strengthening those who were helped or assisted and much lower proneness to small works of consoling among the students who have completed the undergraduate nursing studies.
In the study, the researchers assessed the security of child-mother attachment relationships for 114 children at 33 months, and parents reported on their child's temperament, including anger proneness and social fearfulness.
But it triggers some unwanted tendencies in many of us, like the fear of our own death, aversion to silence and proneness to guilt.
The preponderance of premature deaths due to external factors suggests that one of the most likely explanations for the findings in the current study is the existence of personality characteristics of impulsiveness, risk-taking behaviors, and proneness to substance abuse.