propagation


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Related to propagation: Plant propagation, Radio propagation

prop·a·ga·tion

 (prŏp′ə-gā′shən)
n.
1. Multiplication or increase, as by natural reproduction.
2. The process of spreading to a larger area or greater number; dissemination.
3. Physics The act or process of propagating, especially the process by which a disturbance, such as the motion of electromagnetic or sound waves, is transmitted through a medium such as air or water.

prop′a·ga′tion·al adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.propagation - the spreading of something (a belief or practice) into new regions
airing, dissemination, public exposure, spreading - the opening of a subject to widespread discussion and debate
2.propagation - the act of producing offspring or multiplying by such production
facts of life, procreation, reproduction, breeding - the sexual activity of conceiving and bearing offspring
biogeny, biogenesis - the production of living organisms from other living organisms
3.propagation - the movement of a wave through a medium
physical phenomenon - a natural phenomenon involving the physical properties of matter and energy
Doppler effect, Doppler shift - change in the apparent frequency of a wave as observer and source move toward or away from each other
red shift, redshift - (astronomy) a shift in the spectra of very distant galaxies toward longer wavelengths (toward the red end of the spectrum); generally interpreted as evidence that the universe is expanding
wave front - all the points just reached by a wave as it propagates

propagation

noun
2. reproduction, generation, breeding, increase, proliferation, multiplication, procreation the successful propagation of a batch of new plants

propagation

noun
The process by which an organism produces others of its kind:
Obsolete: increase.
Translations
نَشْر، بَث، تكاثُر
propagace
formering
szaporítás
ræktun; æxlun
propagatie
üremeyayma

propagation

[ˌprɒpəˈgeɪʃən] Npropagación f

propagation

[ˌprɒpəˈgeɪʃən] n
[+ idea] → propagation f
[+ plant] → propagation f

propagation

n (= reproduction)Fortpflanzung f; (Hort: of plants) → Vermehrung f; (= dissemination)Verbreitung f; (of views)Verbreitung f, → Propagierung f

propagation

[ˌprɒpəˈgeɪʃn] n (see vb) → propagazione f, riproduzione f

propagate

(ˈpropəgeit) verb
1. to spread (news etc).
2. to (make plants) produce seeds.
ˌpropaˈgation noun

prop·a·ga·tion

n. propagación, reproducción.
References in classic literature ?
In a word, without going over all the journals in the world, there was not a scientific publication, from the Journal of Evangelical Missions to the Revue Algerienne et Coloniale, from the Annales de la Propagation de la Foi to the Church Missionary Intelligencer, that had not something to say about the affair in all its phases.
The viceroy promised that if I could procure any assistance, he would command in person the fleet and forces raised for the expedition, assuring that he thought he could not employ his life better than in a war so holy, and of so great an importance, to the propagation of the Catholic faith.
Men attach importance only to self-preservation and the propagation of their species.
They measured fifteen feet in height, and 150 to 175 yards long, and their speed of propagation was thirty feet per second.
The Turk hath at hand, for cause of war, the propagation of his law or sect; a quarrel that he may always command.
His way lying through many streets, and the houses not yet being open, he sits down to breakfast on the door-step of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts and gives it a brush when he has finished as an acknowledgment of the accommodation.
This cavity had been left there for the sole purpose of providing a place for the creation and propagation of the Mahar race.
or what more laudable than the propagation of our species?
And it is pleasant to write down that they reared a family; because any propagation of goodness and benevolence is no small addition to the aristocracy of nature, and no small subject of rejoicing for mankind at large.
Hence, the cost of production of a workman is restricted, almost entirely, to the means of subsistence that he requires for his maintenance, and for the propagation of his race.
He had looked, moreover, not only at all the pictures, but at all the copies that were going forward around them, in the hands of those innumerable young women in irreproachable toilets who devote themselves, in France, to the propagation of masterpieces, and if the truth must be told, he had often admired the copy much more than the original.
invaluable assistance in the propagation of his sombre faith.

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