propensity


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pro·pen·si·ty

 (prə-pĕn′sĭ-tē)
n. pl. pro·pen·si·ties
An innate inclination; a tendency.

[From propense, inclined, from Latin prōpēnsus, past participle of prōpendēre, to be inclined; see propend.]

propensity

(prəˈpɛnsɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. a natural tendency or disposition
2. obsolete partiality
Also: propension
[C16: from Latin prōpensus inclined to, from prōpendēre to propend]

pro•pen•si•ty

(prəˈpɛn sɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. a natural inclination or tendency.
2. Obs. favorable disposition or partiality.
[1560–70; propense inclined < Latin prōpēnsus, past participle of prōpendēre to hang down, be inclined]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.propensity - an inclination to do somethingpropensity - an inclination to do something; "he felt leanings toward frivolity"
inclination - that toward which you are inclined to feel a liking; "her inclination is for classical music"
2.propensity - a natural inclination; "he has a proclivity for exaggeration"
inclination, tendency, disposition - an attitude of mind especially one that favors one alternative over others; "he had an inclination to give up too easily"; "a tendency to be too strict"
3.propensity - a disposition to behave in a certain way; "the aptness of iron to rust"; "the propensity of disease to spread"
disposition - a natural or acquired habit or characteristic tendency in a person or thing; "a swelling with a disposition to rupture"

propensity

noun tendency, leaning, weakness, inclination, bent, liability, bias, disposition, penchant, susceptibility, predisposition, proclivity, proneness, aptness She hadn't reckoned on his propensity for violence.

propensity

noun
Translations

propensity

[prəˈpensɪtɪ] Npropensión f (to a)

propensity

[prəʊˈpɛnsɪti] npropension f
a propensity for sth → une propension à qch
a propensity for doing sth → une propension à faire qch
a propensity to do sth → une propension à faire qch

propensity

nHang m, → Neigung f(to zu); to have a propensity for somethingeinen Hang zu etw haben; to have a propensity to do something or for doing somethingdazu neigen, etw zu tun, die Neigung or den Hang haben, etw zu tun

propensity

[prəˈpɛnsɪtɪ] ntendenza
propensity (for) → propensione f (per)
References in classic literature ?
If each blow in the proper direction drives an evil propensity out, it follows that every thump in an opposite one knocks its quota of wickedness in.
Thus he went on increasing in iniquity, month after month, until, at the close of the first year, he not only insisted upon wearing moustaches, but had contracted a propensity for cursing and swearing, and for backing his assertions by bets.
The friend of popular governments never finds himself so much alarmed for their character and fate, as when he contemplates their propensity to this dangerous vice.
Robson likewise encouraged Tom's propensity to persecute the lower creation, both by precept and example.
There was excellent blood in his veins --royal stuff; though sadly vitiated, I fear, by the cannibal propensity he nourished in his untutored youth.
Without human propensity to murder and other sorts of unrighteousness there would have been no historical heroism.
It may seem remarkable, that, of four persons whom we have commemorated at Mr Allworthy's house, three of them should fix their inclinations on a lady who was never greatly celebrated for her beauty, and who was, moreover, now a little descended into the vale of years; but in reality bosom friends, and intimate acquaintance, have a kind of natural propensity to particular females at the house of a friend--viz.
Catherine, though she could not help wondering that with such perfect command of his horse, he should think it necessary to alarm her with a relation of its tricks, congratulated herself sincerely on being under the care of so excellent a coachman; and perceiving that the animal continued to go on in the same quiet manner, without showing the smallest propensity towards any unpleasant vivacity, and (considering its inevitable pace was ten miles an hour) by no means alarmingly fast, gave herself up to all the enjoyment of air and exercise of the most invigorating kind, in a fine mild day of February, with the consciousness of safety.
Pontellier and her possible propensity for taking young men seriously was apparently forgotten.
Hereby perhaps Stubb indirectly hinted, that though man loved his fellow, yet man is a money-making animal, which propensity too often interferes with his benevolence.
For now I could no longer deny that I was a real YAHOO in every limb and feature, since the females had a natural propensity to me, as one of their own species.
If against the present one any objection be raised on the score of its truth, it can only be that its author was an Arab, as lying is a very common propensity with those of that nation; though, as they are such enemies of ours, it is conceivable that there were omissions rather than additions made in the course of it.