prophesy


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proph·e·sy

 (prŏf′ĭ-sī′, -sē′)
v. proph·e·sied (-sīd′, -sēd′), proph·e·sy·ing (-sī′ĭng, -sē′ĭng), proph·e·sies (-sīz′, -sēz′)
v.tr.
1. To reveal by divine inspiration.
2. To predict the future with certainty. See Synonyms at foretell.
3. To prefigure or foreshadow: "The wind was in the east, and the clouds prophesied rain" (Jacob Riis).
v.intr.
1. To reveal the will or message of God; speak or write as a prophet.
2. To predict future events; make predictions.

[Middle English prophecien, from Old French prophecier, from prophecie, prophecy; see prophecy.]

proph′e·si′er n.

prophesy

(ˈprɒfɪˌsaɪ)
vb, -sies, -sying or -sied
1. (Theology) to reveal or foretell (something, esp a future event) by or as if by divine inspiration
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) (intr) archaic to give instruction in religious subjects
[C14 prophecien, from prophecy]
ˈpropheˌsiable adj
ˈpropheˌsier n

proph•e•sy

(ˈprɒf əˌsaɪ)

v. -sied, -sy•ing. v.t.
1. to foretell or predict.
2. to indicate beforehand.
3. to utter in prophecy.
v.i.
4. to make predictions, esp. by divine inspiration.
5. to speak as a mediator between God and humankind or in God's stead.
[1350–1400; Middle English; v. use of variant of prophecy]
proph′e•si`er, n.
syn: See predict.

prophesy


Past participle: prophesied
Gerund: prophesying

Imperative
prophesy
prophesy
Present
I prophesy
you prophesy
he/she/it prophesies
we prophesy
you prophesy
they prophesy
Preterite
I prophesied
you prophesied
he/she/it prophesied
we prophesied
you prophesied
they prophesied
Present Continuous
I am prophesying
you are prophesying
he/she/it is prophesying
we are prophesying
you are prophesying
they are prophesying
Present Perfect
I have prophesied
you have prophesied
he/she/it has prophesied
we have prophesied
you have prophesied
they have prophesied
Past Continuous
I was prophesying
you were prophesying
he/she/it was prophesying
we were prophesying
you were prophesying
they were prophesying
Past Perfect
I had prophesied
you had prophesied
he/she/it had prophesied
we had prophesied
you had prophesied
they had prophesied
Future
I will prophesy
you will prophesy
he/she/it will prophesy
we will prophesy
you will prophesy
they will prophesy
Future Perfect
I will have prophesied
you will have prophesied
he/she/it will have prophesied
we will have prophesied
you will have prophesied
they will have prophesied
Future Continuous
I will be prophesying
you will be prophesying
he/she/it will be prophesying
we will be prophesying
you will be prophesying
they will be prophesying
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been prophesying
you have been prophesying
he/she/it has been prophesying
we have been prophesying
you have been prophesying
they have been prophesying
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been prophesying
you will have been prophesying
he/she/it will have been prophesying
we will have been prophesying
you will have been prophesying
they will have been prophesying
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been prophesying
you had been prophesying
he/she/it had been prophesying
we had been prophesying
you had been prophesying
they had been prophesying
Conditional
I would prophesy
you would prophesy
he/she/it would prophesy
we would prophesy
you would prophesy
they would prophesy
Past Conditional
I would have prophesied
you would have prophesied
he/she/it would have prophesied
we would have prophesied
you would have prophesied
they would have prophesied
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.prophesy - predict or reveal through, or as if through, divine inspiration
forebode, predict, prognosticate, foretell, promise, anticipate, call - make a prediction about; tell in advance; "Call the outcome of an election"
vaticinate - foretell through or as if through the power of prophecy
irradiate, enlighten - give spiritual insight to; in religion
2.prophesy - deliver a sermon; "The minister is not preaching this Sunday"
evangelise, evangelize - preach the gospel (to)
lecture, talk - deliver a lecture or talk; "She will talk at Rutgers next week"; "Did you ever lecture at Harvard?"

prophesy

verb predict, forecast, divine, foresee, augur, presage, foretell, forewarn, prognosticate, soothsay, vaticinate (rare) She prophesied the Great Fire of London and her own death in 1561.

prophesy

verb
To tell about or make known (future events) by or as if by supernatural means:
Translations
يَتَنَبَّأ
prorokovatvěštit
forudsigespå
proreći
jövendöl
spá, segja fyrir um
veštiť
prerokovati
kehanette bulunmak

prophesy

[ˈprɒfɪsaɪ] VT (= foretell) → profetizar; (= predict) → predecir, vaticinar

prophesy

[ˈprɒfɪsaɪ]
vtprophétiser
viprophétiser

prophesy

prophesy

[ˈprɒfɪˌsaɪ] vtpredire, profetizzare

prophecy

(ˈprofəsi) plural ˈprophecies noun
1. the power of foretelling the future.
2. something that is foretold. He made many prophecies about the future.
ˈprophesy (-sai) verb
to foretell. He prophesied (that there would be) another war.
ˈprophet (-fit) feminine ˈprophetess noun
1. a person who (believes that he) is able to foretell the future.
2. a person who tells people what God wants, intends etc. the prophet Isaiah.
proˈphetic (-ˈfe-) adjective
proˈphetically adverb

prophecy is a noun: Her prophecy (not prophesy) came true.
prophesy is a verb: to prophesy (not prophecy) the future.
References in classic literature ?
I now prophesy that I will dismember my dismemberer.
Some forms of disease, even, may prophesy forms of health.
With pleasure," said he, "though I venture to prophesy that you'll want very few hints.
And now, as one who is about to die, he will prophesy to them.
The only refuge left for those who prophesy the downfall of the State governments is the visionary supposition that the federal government may previously accumulate a military force for the projects of ambition.
Eurymachus son of Polybus then said, "Go home, old man, and prophesy to your own children, or it may be worse for them.
Old Master Cheever had lived so long, and seen so many generations of school-boys grow up to be men, that now he can almost prophesy what sort of a man each boy will be.
I prophesy you will soon spoil him; any one could see how proud he grew, in a short time, just because he stood by my horses’ heads.
how I have trembled at my uncle's opening his lips if horses were talked of), and then think of the kind pains you took to reason and persuade me out of my fears, and convince me that I should like it after a little while, and feel how right you proved to be, I am inclined to hope you may always prophesy as well.
You good, fat people always prophesy ruin if things don't go exactly your way.
The peasant made the raven prophesy still more, and said: 'Thirdly, he says that there is some salad on the bed.
Listen, the spirit of life is in me and I prophesy.