proprietorial


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Related to proprietorial: Quare, Perseverant

pro·pri·e·tor

 (prə-prī′ĭ-tər)
n.
1. One who has legal title to something; an owner.
2. One who owns or owns and manages a business or other such establishment.

[Probably alteration of Middle English proprietarie; see proprietary.]

pro·pri′e·to′ri·al (-tôr′ē-əl) adj.
pro·pri′e·to′ri·al·ly adv.
pro·pri′e·tor·ship′ n.
Translations

proprietorial

[prəˌpraɪəˈtɔːrɪəl] ADJ [attitude etc] → protector

proprietorial

[prəˌpraɪəˈtɔːriəl] adj [person, attitude] → possessif/ive
to be proprietorial about sth → être possessif avec qch

proprietorial

[prɒpraɪəˈtɔːrɪəl] (frm) adj
a. (behaviour, attitude) → possessivo/a
b. (duties, rights) → del proprietario
References in classic literature ?
She was accustomed to being looked at admiringly, but about this particular look there was a subtle quality that distinguished it from the ordinary--something proprietorial.
Cornwallis, through a sweeping settlement regime, granted proprietorial or effective ownership rights over land to the people who held it, doing away with practice of all land ownership being vested in the Sovereign and, even if a chunk of it was awarded as jagir to a grandee, its reversal to the crown by law of escheat once the noble died.
This in turn raises the question of who really has a proprietorial interest in any business - with Jin's the customers are simply asserting their public interest.
Cox, who plays the lead role in new movie Churchill, wrote: "Every self-respecting Scot comes over all proprietorial when introducing the glories of their country to a friend or loved one for the first time.
Therefore, the headteacher, as trustee of what is claimed to be the proprietorial body of the school, has not been subject to the additional checks made on proprietors by the Department for Education.
When it comes to product names, innovators can feel understandably proprietorial.
All in all, probably best for everyone if this remains a single cat household If the feline in your life is good - or proprietorial - enough to be Cat Of The Week, send a photo and details to polly.
Third, it provided additional moral pressure forcing Gladstone's government to introduce its land bill of 1881, thereby giving legislative and legal standing to "dual ownership," a term that expressed the tenants' proprietorial interest in their holdings.
It enjoyed initial success rising to a circulation passing 400,000 by 1988, and claimed it was free from proprietorial influence.
FOR the moment, however, in the confines of his own hut, Carwyn had more pressing needs and, as the boots attained their supreme gloss on the bed opposite, he took a fatherly interest in them, expressing a proprietorial interest.