propulsion


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Related to propulsion: rocket propulsion

pro·pul·sion

 (prə-pŭl′shən)
n.
1. The process of driving or propelling.
2. A driving or propelling force.

[Medieval Latin prōpulsiō, prōpulsiōn-, onslaught, urging on, from Latin prōpulsus, past participle of prōpellere, to drive forward; see propel.]

pro·pul′sive, pro·pul′so·ry (-sə-rē) adj.

propulsion

(prəˈpʌlʃən)
n
1. the act of propelling or the state of being propelled
2. a propelling force
[C15: from Latin prōpellere to propel]
propulsive, proˈpulsory adj

pro•pul•sion

(prəˈpʌl ʃən)

n.
1. the act of propelling.
2. the state of being propelled.
3. a propelling force, impulse, etc.
[1605–15; < Latin prōpuls(us) (past participle of prōpellere to propel) + -ion]
pro•pul′sive (-sɪv) pro•pul′so•ry, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.propulsion - a propelling forcepropulsion - a propelling force      
force - (physics) the influence that produces a change in a physical quantity; "force equals mass times acceleration"
nuclear propulsion - the use of a nuclear reactor either to produce electricity to power an engine (as in a nuclear submarine) or to directly heat a propellant (as in nuclear rockets)
reaction propulsion - propulsion that results from the ejection at high velocity of a mass of gas to which the vehicle reacts with an equal and opposite momentum
2.propulsion - the act of propellingpropulsion - the act of propelling    
human action, human activity, act, deed - something that people do or cause to happen
launch, launching - the act of propelling with force
launching - the act of moving a newly built vessel into the water for the first time
drive, driving force, thrust - the act of applying force to propel something; "after reaching the desired velocity the drive is cut off"
bowl, roll - the act of rolling something (as the ball in bowling)
throw - the act of throwing (propelling something with a rapid movement of the arm and wrist); "the catcher made a good throw to second base"
push, pushing - the act of applying force in order to move something away; "he gave the door a hard push"; "the pushing is good exercise"
pull, pulling - the act of pulling; applying force to move something toward or with you; "the pull up the hill had him breathing harder"; "his strenuous pulling strained his back"
raise, heave, lift - the act of raising something; "he responded with a lift of his eyebrow"; "fireman learn several different raises for getting ladders up"
ejection, forcing out, expulsion, projection - the act of expelling or projecting or ejecting
jumping, jump - the act of jumping; propelling yourself off the ground; "he advanced in a series of jumps"; "the jumping was unexpected"
lob - the act of propelling something (as a ball or shell etc.) in a high arc
wheeling, rolling - propelling something on wheels
shooting, shot - the act of firing a projectile; "his shooting was slow but accurate"
dribbling, dribble - the propulsion of a ball by repeated taps or kicks

propulsion

noun power, pressure, push, thrust, momentum, impulse, impetus, motive power, impulsion, propelling force For some time electric propulsion has been seen as a possible answer.
Translations
دَفْع، تَسْيير
pohon
=-fremdriftfremdrift
hajtás
knúningur
推力
pohon
it meitici kuvvet

propulsion

[prəˈpʌlʃən] Npropulsión f
see also jet D

propulsion

[prəˈpʌlʃən] npropulsion f

propulsion

nAntrieb m

propulsion

[prəˈpʌlʃn] n jet propulsionpropulsione f a getto

propel

(prəˈpel) past tense, past participle proˈpelled verb
to drive forward, especially mechanically. The boat is propelled by a diesel engine.
proˈpeller noun
a device, consisting of revolving blades, used to drive a ship or an aircraft.
proˈpulsion (-ˈpalʃən) noun
the process of propelling or being propelled. jet-propulsion.
proˌpelling-ˈpencil noun
a pencil consisting of a metal or plastic case containing a lead that is pushed forward by a screwing mechanism.
References in classic literature ?
To the whale, his tail is the sole means of propulsion.
There was one thwart set as low as possible, a kind of stretcher in the bows, and a double paddle for propulsion.
The medium of buoyancy is contained within the thin metal walls of the body and consists of the eighth Barsoomian ray, or ray of propulsion, as it may be termed in view of its properties.
These two points were of the very essence of sailing tactics, and these two points have been eliminated from the modern tactical problem by the changes of propulsion and armament.
Monck Mason (whose voyage from Dover to Weilburg in the balloon, "Nassau," occasioned so much excitement in 1837,) conceived the idea of employing the principle of the Archimedean screw for the purpose of propulsion through the air - rightly attributing the failure of Mr.
Because of their steam propulsion, the American ships were larger and with a more graceful outline.
There was another little idiosyncrasy of design that escaped us both until she was about ready to launch--there was no method of propulsion.
Simultaneous with this, Captain Duncan's second kick landed, communicating such propulsion to Michael as to tear his clenched teeth through the flesh and out of the flesh of the fox-terrier.
The human is rarely born these days, who, without long training in the social associations of drinking, feels the irresistible chemical propulsion of his system toward alcohol.
The tendency of the individual life is to be static rather than dynamic, and this tendency is made into a propulsion by civilization, where the obvious only is seen, and the unexpected rarely happens.
So there will be no loss whatever of gas, and all the expansive force of the powder will be employed in the propulsion.
Laplace has calculated that a force five times greater than that of our gun would suffice to send a meteor from the moon to the earth, and there is not one volcano which has not a greater power of propulsion than that.