prose


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Related to prose: short story

prose

 (prōz)
n.
1. Ordinary speech or writing, without metrical structure.
2. Commonplace expression or quality.
3. Roman Catholic Church A hymn of irregular meter sung before the Gospel.
intr.v. prosed, pros·ing, pros·es
1. To write prose.
2. To speak or write in a dull, tiresome style.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin prōsa (ōrātiō), straightforward (discourse), feminine of prōsus, alteration of prōrsus, from prōversus, past participle of prōvertere, to turn forward : prō-, forward; see pro-1 + vertere, to turn; see wer-2 in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

prose

(prəʊz)
n
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) spoken or written language as in ordinary usage, distinguished from poetry by its lack of a marked metrical structure
2. (Education) a passage set for translation into a foreign language
3. commonplace or dull discourse, expression, etc
4. (Roman Catholic Church) RC Church a hymn recited or sung after the gradual at Mass
5. (modifier) written in prose
6. (modifier) matter-of-fact
vb
7. to write or say (something) in prose
8. (intr) to speak or write in a tedious style
[C14: via Old French from Latin phrase prōsa ōrātiō straightforward speech, from prorsus prosaic, from prōvertere to turn forwards, from pro-1 + vertere to turn]
ˈproseˌlike adj

prose

(proʊz)

n., adj., v. prosed, pros•ing. n.
1. the ordinary form of spoken or written language, without metrical structure, as distinguished from poetry or verse.
2. matter-of-fact, commonplace, or dull expression, quality, discourse, etc.
adj.
3. of, in, or pertaining to prose.
4. commonplace; prosaic.
v.t.
5. to turn into or express in prose.
v.i.
6. to write or talk in a dull, matter-of-fact manner.
[1300–50; Middle English < Middle French < Latin prōsa (ōrātiō) literally, straightforward (speech), feminine of prōsus, for prōrsus, contraction of prōversus, past participle of prōvertere to turn forward =prō- pro-1 + vertere to turn]

prose


Past participle: prosed
Gerund: prosing

Imperative
prose
prose
Present
I prose
you prose
he/she/it proses
we prose
you prose
they prose
Preterite
I prosed
you prosed
he/she/it prosed
we prosed
you prosed
they prosed
Present Continuous
I am prosing
you are prosing
he/she/it is prosing
we are prosing
you are prosing
they are prosing
Present Perfect
I have prosed
you have prosed
he/she/it has prosed
we have prosed
you have prosed
they have prosed
Past Continuous
I was prosing
you were prosing
he/she/it was prosing
we were prosing
you were prosing
they were prosing
Past Perfect
I had prosed
you had prosed
he/she/it had prosed
we had prosed
you had prosed
they had prosed
Future
I will prose
you will prose
he/she/it will prose
we will prose
you will prose
they will prose
Future Perfect
I will have prosed
you will have prosed
he/she/it will have prosed
we will have prosed
you will have prosed
they will have prosed
Future Continuous
I will be prosing
you will be prosing
he/she/it will be prosing
we will be prosing
you will be prosing
they will be prosing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been prosing
you have been prosing
he/she/it has been prosing
we have been prosing
you have been prosing
they have been prosing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been prosing
you will have been prosing
he/she/it will have been prosing
we will have been prosing
you will have been prosing
they will have been prosing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been prosing
you had been prosing
he/she/it had been prosing
we had been prosing
you had been prosing
they had been prosing
Conditional
I would prose
you would prose
he/she/it would prose
we would prose
you would prose
they would prose
Past Conditional
I would have prosed
you would have prosed
he/she/it would have prosed
we would have prosed
you would have prosed
they would have prosed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.prose - ordinary writing as distinguished from verse
euphuism - an elegant style of prose of the Elizabethan period; characterized by balance and antithesis and alliteration and extended similes with and allusions to nature and mythology
nonfiction, nonfictional prose - prose writing that is not fictional
interior monologue - a literary genre that presents a fictional character's sequence of thoughts in the form of a monologue
stream of consciousness - a literary genre that reveals a character's thoughts and feeling as they develop by means of a long soliloquy
prose poem - prose that resembles poetry
polyphonic prose - a rhythmical prose employing the poetic devices of alliteration and assonance
literary genre, writing style, genre - a style of expressing yourself in writing
2.prose - matter of fact, commonplace, or dull expression
expressive style, style - a way of expressing something (in language or art or music etc.) that is characteristic of a particular person or group of people or period; "all the reporters were expected to adopt the style of the newspaper"

prose

noun
Quotations
"Prose = words in their best order; poetry = the best words in their best order" [Samuel Taylor Coleridge Table Talk]
"Prose is when all the lines except the last go on to the end. Poetry is when some of them fall short of it" [Jeremy Bentham]
"All that is not prose is verse; and all that is not verse is prose" [Molière Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme]
Translations
نَثْر
próza
prosa
proosa
proosa
próza
prosa
prósi, óbundiî mál
proza
proza
próza

prose

[prəʊz]
A. N
1. (Literat) → prosa f
2. (Scol) (also prose translation) → texto m para traducir (also prose composition) → traducción f inversa
B. CPD prose poem Npoema m en prosa
prose writer Nprosista mf

prose

[ˈprəʊz] n
(= written language) → prose f
(SCHOOL) (= translation) → thème m

prose

nProsa f; (= writing, style)Stil m; (Sch, Univ: = translation text) → Übersetzung fin die Fremdsprache, Hinübersetzung f

prose

:
prose poem
nProsagedicht nt
prose style
nStil m
prose writer
nProsaschriftsteller(in) m(f)
prose writing

prose

[prəʊz] nprosa (Scol) (translation) → traduzione f dalla lingua madre or madrelingua

prose

(prəuz) noun
writing that is not in verse; ordinary written or spoken language.
References in classic literature ?
The attraction of my small charges was a constant joy, leading me to wonder afresh at the vanity of my original fears, the distaste I had begun by entertaining for the probable gray prose of my office.
In plain prose, here are four whales as well known to the students of Cetacean History as Marius or Sylla to the classic scholar.
Certainly you may; it will only help you to write better prose.
It is a sort of prologue to the play, a motto to the chapter; and will be soon followed by matteroffact prose.
He would certainly have done more justice to simple and elegant prose.
Those books, both prose and verse, are consecrated to me by other associations; and I hate to have them debased and profaned in his mouth
I counted up to high numbers, to make sure of myself, and repeated passages that I knew in prose and verse.
Of Mans First Disobedience, and the Fruit Of that Forbidden Tree, whose mortal tast Brought Death into the World, and all our woe, With loss of EDEN, till one greater Man Restore us, and regain the blissful Seat, Sing Heav'nly Muse, that on the secret top Of OREB, or of SINAI, didst inspire That Shepherd, who first taught the chosen Seed, In the Beginning how the Heav'ns and Earth Rose out of CHAOS: Or if SION Hill Delight thee more, and SILOA'S Brook that flow'd Fast by the Oracle of God; I thence Invoke thy aid to my adventrous Song, That with no middle flight intends to soar Above th' AONIAN Mount, while it pursues Things unattempted yet in Prose or Rhime.
Yet, though quarter-staff play be out of date, what we can in prose we will do for these bold champions.
Most people become bankrupt through having invested too heavily in the prose of life.
I am of opinion it should not be burned, but that it should be cleared of all that about the sage Felicia and the magic water, and of almost all the longer pieces of verse: let it keep, and welcome, its prose and the honour of being the first of books of the kind.
There is another art which imitates by means of language alone, and that either in prose or verse--which, verse, again, may either combine different metres or consist of but one kind--but this has hitherto been without a name.