prosody

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pros·o·dy

 (prŏs′ə-dē)
n. pl. pros·o·dies
1. The study of the metrical structure of verse.
2. A particular system of versification.
3. The set of speech variables, including rhythm, speed, pitch, and relative emphasis, that distinguish vocal patterns.

[Middle English prosodie, from Latin prosōdia, accent, from Greek prosōidiā, song sung to music, accent : pros-, pros- + ōidē, song; see ode.]

pro·sod′ic (prə-sŏd′ĭk) adj.
pro·sod′i·cal·ly adv.
pros′o·dist n.

prosody

(ˈprɒsədɪ)
n
1. (Poetry) the study of poetic metre and of the art of versification, including rhyme, stanzaic forms, and the quantity and stress of syllables
2. (Poetry) a system of versification
3. (Linguistics) the patterns of stress and intonation in a language
[C15: from Latin prosōdia accent of a syllable, from Greek prosōidia song set to music, from pros towards + ōidē, from aoidē song; see ode]
prosodic adj
ˈprosodist n

pros•o•dy

(ˈprɒs ə di)

n., pl. -dies.
1. the science or study of poetic meters and versification.
2. a particular or distinctive system of metrics and versification: Milton's prosody.
3. the stress and intonation patterns of an utterance.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin prosōdia < Greek prosōidía accent of a syllable, modulation of voice, song =pros- toward + ōid(ḗ) ode + -ia -y3]
pro•sod•ic (prəˈsɒd ɪk) pro•sod′i•cal, adj.

prosody

1. the science or study of poetic meters and versification.
2. a particular or distinctive system of metrics and versification, as that of Dylan Thomas. — prosodist, n.prosodie, prosodical, adj.
See also: Verse

prosody

The principles and elements of versification: meter, rhyme, etc.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.prosody - the patterns of stress and intonation in a language
manner of speaking, delivery, speech - your characteristic style or manner of expressing yourself orally; "his manner of speaking was quite abrupt"; "her speech was barren of southernisms"; "I detected a slight accent in his speech"
intonation, pitch contour, modulation - rise and fall of the voice pitch
caesura - a break or pause (usually for sense) in the middle of a verse line
enjambement, enjambment - the continuation of a syntactic unit from one line of verse into the next line without a pause
stress, accent, emphasis - the relative prominence of a syllable or musical note (especially with regard to stress or pitch); "he put the stress on the wrong syllable"
speech rhythm, rhythm - the arrangement of spoken words alternating stressed and unstressed elements; "the rhythm of Frost's poetry"
2.prosody - (prosody) a system of versification
metrics, prosody - the study of poetic meter and the art of versification
poem, verse form - a composition written in metrical feet forming rhythmical lines
versification - the form or metrical composition of a poem
cadence, metre, meter, measure, beat - (prosody) the accent in a metrical foot of verse
sprung rhythm - a poetic rhythm that imitates the rhythm of speech
3.prosody - the study of poetic meter and the art of versificationprosody - the study of poetic meter and the art of versification
poetics - study of poetic works
acatalectic - (prosody) a line of verse that has the full number of syllables
Alexandrine - (prosody) a line of verse that has six iambic feet
catalectic - (prosody) a line of verse that lacks a syllable in the last metrical foot
hypercatalectic - (prosody) a line of poetry having an extra syllable or syllables at the end of the last metrical foot
poetic rhythm, rhythmic pattern, prosody - (prosody) a system of versification
cadence, metre, meter, measure, beat - (prosody) the accent in a metrical foot of verse
metrical foot, metrical unit, foot - (prosody) a group of 2 or 3 syllables forming the basic unit of poetic rhythm
iambic - of or consisting of iambs; "iambic pentameter"
dactylic - of or consisting of dactyls; "dactylic meter"
spondaic - of or consisting of spondees; "spondaic hexameter"
trochaic - of or consisting of trochees; "trochaic dactyl"
Translations

prosody

[ˈprɒsədɪ] Nmétrica f

prosody

nVerslehre f

prosody

[ˈprɒsədɪ] nprosodia
References in classic literature ?
are so called in honor of a poet named Leo, whom prosodists appear to
Many Victorian poets and prosodists, however, forbid its use: first, the English language supposedly was rhyme poor and thus could not reach the heights of rhyme set by the French; second, English culture allegedly disdained the pun; and third, the English ear purportedly required rhyme to have some dissonance in order to appeal.
Meter is basically duple, but it permits this duple patterning to be stretched to triple patterning, either in a local way (what prosodists call "caudation," or possessing a tail) or as a norm.
meter so as to drive prosodists "right out of their minds.
Musicologists and prosodists have considered that when music and words diverge--in composers like Brahms or Wolf--pitch and duration reside in the score while articulation and phonetic timbre reside in the poetry.
No one would deny that verse primitivism became vital with the Romantics, most famously through the ballad revival, but Byron, Shelley, and Keats are certainly as "sophisticated" prosodists as any of the 18th century.
The stand-out chapter of Form and Faith is devoted to Alfred Tennyson, a figure frequently examined by prosodists in relation to Arthur Hallam's 1831 review of Poems, Chiefly Lyrical, an essay that tends to obscure the poet's religious concerns.
I regard the composers as among the finest prosodists in all of Western music, and I taught the Schubert and Stravinsky in my graduate course on text and music.
Mezey: As I've said, all the poetry I read before high school was in traditional forms and so was whatever poetry I wrote, and the translations, and I went on writing in meter all through high school, and then at Kenyon where Ransom, one of the great prosodists as well as a marvelous poet, and his colleagues immersed us in poetry, almost all of it in meter--Whitman was not worshipped there; the poets most admired and talked about and read were Hardy and Robinson.
By the beginning of the twentieth century, it had become accepted as a fact, by Parisian poets and by prosodists, that the 'e muet' of the feminine rhyme was not pronounced, and had not been pronounced for centuries.
Tsur's cognitive poetics is descriptive, not normative Opposed to what he calls the bookkeeping approaches to stress and metric patterning, and to approaches that leave out the dimension of performance, Tsur describes his cognitive poetics as a "small Copernican revolution" because, unlike the majority of prosodists, Tsur brings to the understanding of what is rhythmically going on in poetry the performance of the poem and the competence (and willingness) of a reader to perform the poem.
3) In scanning these poems, I am using a metrical notation developed in my doctoral dissertation, "Coleridge and the Undersong of Meter," which combines elements derived from prosodists Derek Attridge, George Wright, and Vladimir Nabokov.