prostitution

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pros·ti·tu·tion

 (prŏs′tĭ-to͞o′shən, -tyo͞o′-)
n.
1.
a. The practice of engaging in sex acts in exchange for money.
b. The criminal offense of engaging in or offering to engage in sex in exchange for money.
2. The practice of offering oneself or using one's talents for an unworthy purpose, especially for personal gain.

pros•ti•tu•tion

(ˌprɒs tɪˈtu ʃən, -ˈtyu-)

n.
1. the act or practice of engaging in sexual intercourse for money.
2. base or unworthy use, as of talent or ability.
[1545–55; < Late Latin prōstitūtiō. See prostitute, -tion]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.prostitution - offering sexual intercourse for payprostitution - offering sexual intercourse for pay
vice crime - a vice that is illegal

prostitution

noun harlotry, the game (slang), vice, the oldest profession, whoredom, streetwalking, harlot's trade, Mrs. Warren's profession She eventually drifted into prostitution.
Translations
بَغاء، دَعارَه، عَهارَه
prostituce
prostitution
prostituutio
वेश्यावृत्ति
prostitúció
vændi
切り売り主義売春淫売買春
prostitúcia
umalaya
orospuluk

prostitution

[ˌprɒstɪˈtjuːʃən] N (lit, fig) → prostitución f

prostitution

[ˌprɒstɪˈtjuːʃən] nprostitution f

prostitution

n (lit, fig)Prostitution f; (of one’s talents, honour, ideals)Verkaufen nt

prostitution

[ˌprɒstɪˈtjuːʃn] nprostituzione f

prostitute

(ˈprostitjuːt) noun
a person who has sexual intercourse for payment.
ˌprostiˈtution noun

prostitution

n. prostitución.
References in periodicals archive ?
In her view, parents permit certain daughters to face prostitutions hazards in order for the family to reap its unparalleled financial returns.
and human rights groups alike have assumed that prostitution and other forms of child exploitation stem from a toxic social brew of poverty mixed with a lack of education and job training.
An anthropologist at the Asia Foundation, a nonprofit policy-and-research organization headquartered in San Francisco, Rende Taylor directed a 14-month study of child labor, prostitution, and sex trafficking in two northern Thai villages.