prostration


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pros·tra·tion

 (prŏ-strā′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act of prostrating oneself.
b. The state of being prostrate.
2. Total exhaustion or weakness; collapse.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.prostration - an abrupt failure of function or complete physical exhaustionprostration - an abrupt failure of function or complete physical exhaustion; "the commander's prostration demoralized his men"
illness, sickness, unwellness, malady - impairment of normal physiological function affecting part or all of an organism
crack-up, breakdown - a mental or physical breakdown
shock - (pathology) bodily collapse or near collapse caused by inadequate oxygen delivery to the cells; characterized by reduced cardiac output and rapid heartbeat and circulatory insufficiency and pallor; "loss of blood is an important cause of shock"
heat hyperpyrexia, heatstroke - collapse caused by exposure to excessive heat
algidity - prostration characterized by cold and clammy skin and low blood pressure
2.prostration - abject submission; the emotional equivalent of prostrating your body
submission, compliance - the act of submitting; usually surrendering power to another
3.prostration - the act of assuming a prostrate position
movement, motility, motion, move - a change of position that does not entail a change of location; "the reflex motion of his eyebrows revealed his surprise"; "movement is a sign of life"; "an impatient move of his hand"; "gastrointestinal motility"
Translations
سُجود، ذُل، إنْبِطاح
zhroucení
det at kaste sig i støvetudmattelse
megalázkodás
örmögnun
bitkinlikyerlere kapanma

prostration

[prɒsˈtreɪʃən] Npostración f (fig) → postración f, abatimiento m

prostration

n (lit)Fußfall m; (fig: = exhaustion) → Erschöpfung f

prostration

[prɒsˈtreɪʃn] n (Med) (exhaustion) → spossatezza

prostrate

(ˈprostreit) adjective
1. lying flat, especially face downwards.
2. completely exhausted or overwhelmed. prostrate with grief.
(prəˈstreit) verb
1. to throw (oneself) flat on the floor, especially in respect or reverence. They prostrated themselves before the emperor.
2. to exhaust or overwhelm. prostrated by the long journey.
proˈstration noun

pros·tra·tion

n. postración, debilidad, abatimiento.
References in classic literature ?
As he passed along, the crowd made lowly prostration before the Image.
Yes, there was a sort of refuge which always comes with the prostration of thought under an overpowering passion: it was that expectation of impossibilities, that belief in contradictory images, which is still distinct from madness, because it is capable of being dissipated by the external fact.
They made a halt at seven o'clock, the young woman being still in a state of complete prostration.
During this prostration of mind and strength, the purse of the Comte de Guiche was getting full again, and when once filled, overflowed into that of De Manicamp, who bought new clothes, dressed himself again, and recommenced the same life he had followed before.
It's all humbug, his talking about economy, when every one knows that business in America has completely recovered, that the prostration is all over, and that immense fortunes are being made.
Rook's hard brain; he's in a state of nervous prostration, which may end badly.
I had found my way to the free public library, and was reading myself into nervous prostration.
There are deferential people in a dozen callings whom my Lady Dedlock suspects of nothing but prostration before her, who can tell you how to manage her as if she were a baby, who do nothing but nurse her all their lives, who, humbly affecting to follow with profound subservience, lead her and her whole troop after them; who, in hooking one, hook all and bear them off as Lemuel Gulliver bore away the stately fleet of the majestic Lilliput.
At this moment, the weakness of the young missionary became so extreme that they had to lay him again on the bed, where a prostration, lasting for several hours, held him like a dead man under the eye of Dr.
I must admit that I was in a state bordering upon nervous prostration when I entered the -and-Club, in Algiers, and inquired for Mr.
Peter Sloane sighed and said she hoped my strength would hold out till I got through; and at once I saw myself a hopeless victim of nervous prostration at the end of my third year; Mrs.
It was pitiful to see Cornelius, dumb with grief, and pale from utter prostration, stretch out his head through the iron bars of his window, at the risk of not being able to draw it back again, to try and get a glimpse of the garden on the left spoken of by Rosa, who had told him that its parapet overlooked the river.