prostration


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pros·tra·tion

 (prŏ-strā′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act of prostrating oneself.
b. The state of being prostrate.
2. Total exhaustion or weakness; collapse.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.prostration - an abrupt failure of function or complete physical exhaustionprostration - an abrupt failure of function or complete physical exhaustion; "the commander's prostration demoralized his men"
illness, sickness, unwellness, malady - impairment of normal physiological function affecting part or all of an organism
crack-up, breakdown - a mental or physical breakdown
shock - (pathology) bodily collapse or near collapse caused by inadequate oxygen delivery to the cells; characterized by reduced cardiac output and rapid heartbeat and circulatory insufficiency and pallor; "loss of blood is an important cause of shock"
heat hyperpyrexia, heatstroke - collapse caused by exposure to excessive heat
algidity - prostration characterized by cold and clammy skin and low blood pressure
2.prostration - abject submission; the emotional equivalent of prostrating your body
submission, compliance - the act of submitting; usually surrendering power to another
3.prostration - the act of assuming a prostrate position
movement, motility, motion, move - a change of position that does not entail a change of location; "the reflex motion of his eyebrows revealed his surprise"; "movement is a sign of life"; "an impatient move of his hand"; "gastrointestinal motility"
Translations
سُجود، ذُل، إنْبِطاح
zhroucení
det at kaste sig i støvetudmattelse
megalázkodás
örmögnun
bitkinlikyerlere kapanma

prostration

[prɒsˈtreɪʃən] Npostración f (fig) → postración f, abatimiento m

prostration

n (lit)Fußfall m; (fig: = exhaustion) → Erschöpfung f

prostration

[prɒsˈtreɪʃn] n (Med) (exhaustion) → spossatezza

prostrate

(ˈprostreit) adjective
1. lying flat, especially face downwards.
2. completely exhausted or overwhelmed. prostrate with grief.
(prəˈstreit) verb
1. to throw (oneself) flat on the floor, especially in respect or reverence. They prostrated themselves before the emperor.
2. to exhaust or overwhelm. prostrated by the long journey.
proˈstration noun

pros·tra·tion

n. postración, debilidad, abatimiento.
References in classic literature ?
But this intensity of his physical prostration did but so much the more abbreviate it.
One evening, he was sitting, in utter dejection and prostration, by a few decaying brands, where his coarse supper was baking.
But it will be very dreadful, with this feeling of hunger, faintness, chill, and this sense of desolation--this total prostration of hope.
If she rallied from her present prostration, Miss Garth should be at once informed of the improvement.
Yes, there was a sort of refuge which always comes with the prostration of thought under an overpowering passion: it was that expectation of impossibilities, that belief in contradictory images, which is still distinct from madness, because it is capable of being dissipated by the external fact.
Thrones, Dominations, Princedomes, Vertues, Powers, If these magnific Titles yet remain Not meerly titular, since by Decree Another now hath to himself ingross't All Power, and us eclipst under the name Of King anointed, for whom all this haste Of midnight march, and hurried meeting here, This onely to consult how we may best With what may be devis'd of honours new Receive him coming to receive from us Knee-tribute yet unpaid, prostration vile, Too much to one, but double how endur'd, To one and to his image now proclaim'd?
Washington, though in retirement, was brooding over the cruel injustice suffered by his associates in arms, the warriors of the Revolution; over the prostration of the public credit and the faith of the nation, in the neglect to provide for the payments even of the interest upon the public debt; over the disappointed hopes of the friends of freedom; in the language of the address from Congress to the States of the eighteenth of April, 1788--"the pride and boast of America, that the rights for which she contended were the rights of human nature.
It was said, moreover, that Don Fernando went away at once, and that Luscinda did not recover from her prostration until the next day, when she told her parents how she was really the bride of that Cardenio I have mentioned.
I slept after the prostration of the day, with a stringent and profound slumber which not even the nightmares that wrung me could avail to break.
Her spirits even were good, and she was full of a happy vivacity, but I could see evidences of the absolute prostration which she had undergone.
They made a halt at seven o'clock, the young woman being still in a state of complete prostration.
One day when I was reproaching him for his unavailing searches, and deploring the prostration of mind that followed them, he looked at me, and, smiling bitterly, opened a volume relating to the History of the City of Rome.