protector


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pro·tec·tor

also pro·tect·er  (prə-tĕk′tər)
n.
1. One who protects; a guardian.
2. A device that protects; a guard.
3. Protector
a. A person who rules a kingdom during the minority of a sovereign.
b. The head of the Commonwealth of England, Scotland, and Ireland from 1653 to 1659.

pro·tec′tor·al adj.
pro·tec′tor·ship′ n.

protector

(prəˈtɛktə)
n
1. a person or thing that protects
2. (Historical Terms) history a person who exercised royal authority during the minority, absence, or incapacity of the monarch
proˈtectoral adj
proˈtectress, proˈtectrix fem n

Protector

(prəˈtɛktə)
n
(Historical Terms) short for Lord Protector, the title borne by Oliver Cromwell (1653–58) and by Richard Cromwell (1658–59) as heads of state during the period known as the Protectorate

pro•tec•tor

(prəˈtɛk tər)

n.
1. a person or thing that protects; defender; guardian.
2. (cap.) Also called Lord Protector. the title of the head of the government during the British Protectorate, held by Oliver Cromwell (1653–58) and by Richard Cromwell (1658–59).
[1325–75; Middle English protectour (< Anglo-French) < Late Latin]
pro•tec′tor•ship`, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.protector - a person who cares for persons or propertyprotector - a person who cares for persons or property
admonisher, monitor, reminder - someone who gives a warning so that a mistake can be avoided
bodyguard, escort - someone who escorts and protects a prominent person
paladin, champion, fighter, hero - someone who fights for a cause
chaperon, chaperone - one who accompanies and supervises a young woman or gatherings of young people
custodian, keeper, steward - one having charge of buildings or grounds or animals
fire fighter, fire-eater, firefighter, fireman - a member of a fire department who tries to extinguish fires
foster parent, foster-parent - a person who acts as parent and guardian for a child in place of the child's natural parents but without legally adopting the child
guard - a person who keeps watch over something or someone
keeper - someone in charge of other people; "am I my brother's keeper?"
law officer, lawman, peace officer - an officer of the law
patron saint - a saint who is considered to be a defender of some group or nation
peacekeeper - someone who keeps peace; "she's the peacekeeper in that family"
preserver - someone who keeps safe from harm or danger
tribune - (ancient Rome) an official elected by the plebeians to protect their interests
watchdog - a guardian or defender against theft or illegal practices or waste; "she is the global watchdog for human rights abuses"

protector

noun
2. guard, screen, protection, shield, pad, cushion, buffer Ear protectors must be worn when operating this equipment.

protector

noun
1. A person or special body of persons assigned to provide protection or keep watch over, for example:
2. The act or a means of defending:
Translations
حامٍ، مُدافِع، واقٍ
ochránce
beskytterprotektor
védelmezõ
verndari
ochranca
koruyucu

protector

[prəˈtektəʳ] N
1. (= defender) → protector(a) m/f
2. (= protective wear) → protector m

protector

[prəˈtɛktər] nprotecteur/trice m/f

protector

n
(= defender)Beschützer(in) m(f)
(= protective wear)Schutz m

protector

[prəˈtɛktəʳ] nprotettore/trice

protect

(prəˈtekt) verb
to guard or defend from danger; to keep safe. She protected the children from every danger; Which type of helmet protects the head best?; He wore a fur jacket to protect himself against the cold.
proˈtected adjective
(of certain animals or birds) protected by law from being shot etc.
proˈtection (-ʃən) noun
1. the act of protecting or state of being protected. He ran to his mother for protection; This type of lock gives extra protection against burglary.
2. something that protects. The trees were a good protection against the wind.
proˈtective (-tiv) adjective
giving, or intended to give, protection. protective clothing/glasses.
proˈtector noun

protector

n protector m; hearing — protector auditivo
References in classic literature ?
The unwonted cry had brought the sisters, together with the wounded David, from their place of refuge; and the whole party, at a single glance, was made acquainted with the nature of the disaster that had disturbed even the practiced stoicism of their youthful Indian protector.
The vigilant protector of the public dashed back into the building.
An the young bride had conveyed notice, as in duty bound, to her feudal lord and proper master and protector the bishop, she had suffered no loss, for the said bishop could have got a dispensation making him, for temporary con- veniency, eligible to the exercise of his said right, and thus would she have kept all she had.
Time had not modified his ancient detestation of the humble drudge and protector of his boyhood; it was still bitter and uncompromising.
On the one occasion when she essayed the part of the tree's romantic protector, she represented herself as feeling "so awful foolish" that she refused to undertake it again, much to the secret delight of Rebecca, who found the woodman's role much too tame for her vaulting ambition.
He became quite attached to me, and was a sort of protector of me.
At last the guard returned; once more I was stowed away in the coach, my protector mounted his own seat, sounded his hollow horn, and away we rattled over the "stony street" of L-.
No; you're not fit to be your own guardian, Isabella, now; and I, being your legal protector, must retain you in my custody, however distasteful the obligation may be.
If you will give these considerations their due weight; if you will exert your excellent common sense, I have no fear of being obliged to appeal to my newly-found friend and protector -- the law.
What was said in this disappointing anti-climax, by the disciples of the Good Republican Brutus of Antiquity, except that it was something very voluble and loud, would have been as so much Hebrew or Chaldean to Miss Pross and her protector, though they had been all ears.
I felt very brave at being left alone in the solitary house, the protector of Em'ly and Mrs.
If, as was most generally the case, they placed themselves under the protection of any of the petty kings in their vicinity, accepted of feudal offices in his household, or bound themselves by mutual treaties of alliance and protection, to support him in his enterprises, they might indeed purchase temporary repose; but it must be with the sacrifice of that independence which was so dear to every English bosom, and at the certain hazard of being involved as a party in whatever rash expedition the ambition of their protector might lead him to undertake.