proteid


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pro·te·id

 (prō′tē-ĭd)
n.
A protein. No longer in scientific use.

proteid

(ˈprəʊtɪɪd)
n
(Biochemistry) a protein
adj
(Biochemistry) relating to proteins
References in classic literature ?
It's all proteids and body-buildings, and people come up to you and beg your pardon, but you have such a beautiful aura.
He studied the composition of food-stuffs, and knew exactly how many proteids and carbohydrates his body needed; and by scientific chewing he said that he tripled the value of all he ate, so that it cost him eleven cents a day.
We recognize that the result of identical kidney anatomy in proteids and sirenids could be caused by a common paedomorphic event, which would seemingly support similarities found within sirenid and proteid karyological morphologies (Morescalchi, 1975) and recent topologies reconstructed from combined molecular and morphological data sets (see Gao and Shu bin, 2001; Frost et al.
Yolk granules and multivesicular bodies were involved in the formation of proteid yolk granules in the late vitellogenic oocyte.
For example, the amalgamation of dc 3 and 4 (dc3 + 4, table 1) is standard in the proteid Necturus and commonly observed in the natural patterns of intraspecific variation of Triturus (Rienesl and Wagner 1992).
On the proteid reaction of Adamkiewicz, with contributions to the chemistry of glyoxylic acid.
The determination of parallel or monophyletic relationships: The proteid salamanders - A test case.