proto-


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Related to proto-: Proto-Indo-European

proto-

or prot-
pref.
1. First in time; earliest: protolithic.
2. First formed; primitive; original: protohuman.
3. Proto- Being a form of a language that is the ancestor of a language or group of related languages: Proto-Germanic.
4. Having the least amount of a specified element or radical: protoporphyrin.

[Greek prōto-, from prōtos; see per in Indo-European roots.]

proto-

or sometimes before a vowel

prot-

combining form
1. indicating the first in time, order, or rank: protomartyr.
2. primitive, ancestral, or original: prototype.
3. (Linguistics) indicating the reconstructed earliest stage of a language: Proto-Germanic.
4. (Chemistry) indicating the first in a series of chemical compounds: protoxide.
5. (Chemistry) indicating the parent of a chemical compound or an element: protactinium.
[from Greek prōtos first, from pro before; see pro-2]

proto-

a combining form meaning “first,” “foremost,” “earliest form of” (prototype; protoplasm); used also in the names of chemical compounds that are the first in a given series or that contain the minimum amount of an element. Also, esp. before a vowel,prot-.
[< Greek, comb. form representing prôtos first, superlative formed from pró; see pro2-]
Translations

proto-

pref
(Chem, Biol) → proto-, Proto-; protolysisProtolyse f
(Ling) → ur-, Ur-; protolanguageUrsprache f
References in periodicals archive ?
According to him, the Indus script was a logo- syllabic writing system with proto- Dravidian as its underlying language.
In this peculiar case, I suppose, early or proto- or quasi- or para- (the last one seems to be the best to me, but the terms are conventional) Baltic *setem-, phonetically *[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII.
McMurray Newsletters (Phoenix, AZ), a division of McMurray, has acquired Copy Editor (New York) newsletter from founder and publisher Mary Beth Proto- mastro.