prove


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prove

 (pro͞ov)
v. proved, proved or prov·en (pro͞o′vən), prov·ing, proves
v.tr.
1.
a. To establish the truth or validity of (something) by the presentation of argument or evidence: The novel proves that the essayist can write in more than one genre. The storm proved him to be wrong in his prediction.
b. To demonstrate the reality of (something): He proved his strength by doing 50 pushups.
c. To show (oneself) to be what is specified or to have a certain characteristic: proved herself to be a formidable debater; proved herself to be worthy of the task.
2. Law
a. To establish by the required amount of evidence: proved his case in court.
b. To establish the authenticity of (a will).
3. Mathematics
a. To demonstrate the validity of (a hypothesis or proposition).
b. To verify (the result of a calculation).
4. To subject (a gun, for instance) to a test.
5. Printing To make a sample impression of (type); proof.
6. Archaic To find out or learn (something) through experience.
v.intr.
To be shown to be such; turn out: a theory that proved impractical in practice; a schedule that proved to be too demanding.
Phrasal Verb:
prove out
To turn out well; succeed.

[Middle English proven, from Old French prover, from Latin probāre, to test, from probus, good; see per in Indo-European roots.]

prov′a·bil′i·ty, prov′a·ble·ness n.
prov′a·ble adj.
prov′a·bly adv.
prov′er n.
Usage Note: Prove has two past participles: proved and proven. Proved is the older form. Proven is a variant. The Middle English spellings of prove included preven, a form that died out in England but survived in Scotland, and the past participle proven probably rose by analogy with verbs like weave, woven and cleave, cloven. Proven was originally used in Scottish legal contexts, such as The jury ruled that the charges were not proven. In the 1900s, proven made inroads into the territory once dominated by proved, so that now the two forms compete on equal footing as participles. However, when used as an adjective before a noun, proven is now the more common word: a proven talent.

prove

(pruːv)
vb (mainly tr) , proves, proving, proved, proved or proven
1. (may take a clause as object or an infinitive) to establish or demonstrate the truth or validity of; verify, esp by using an established sequence of procedures or statements
2. to establish the quality of, esp by experiment or scientific analysis
3. (Law) law to establish the validity and genuineness of (a will)
4. to show (oneself) able or courageous
5. (copula) to be found or shown (to be): this has proved useless; he proved to be invaluable.
6. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) printing to take a trial impression of (type, etc)
7. (Cookery) (intr) (of dough) to rise in a warm place before baking
8. archaic to undergo
[C12: from Old French prover, from Latin probāre to test, from probus honest]
ˈprovable adj
ˌprovaˈbility n
ˈprovably adv

prove

(pruv)

v. proved, proved prov•en, prov•ing. v.t.
1. to establish the truth, genuineness, or validity of, as by evidence or argument.
2. to give demonstration of; cause to be shown as specified: Events have proved me right.
3. to subject to a test, experiment, or analysis to determine quality, characteristics, etc.: to prove ore.
4. to show (oneself) to have the character or ability expected, esp. through one's actions.
5. to verify the correctness or validity of by mathematical demonstration or arithmetical proof.
6. Law. to probate (a will).
7. Also, proof. Print. to take a trial impression of (type, a cut, etc.).
8. to cause (dough) to rise to the necessary lightness.
9. Archaic. to experience.
v.i.
10. to turn out: The experiment proved to be successful.
11. to be found by trial or experience to be: His story proved false.
12. (of dough) to rise to a specified lightness.
[1125–75; Middle English < Old French prover < Latin probāre to approve, examine, prove, derivative of probus good, upright. See probity]
prov′a•ble, adj.
prov`a•bil′i•ty, prov′a•ble•ness, n.
prov′a•bly, adv.
prov′er, n.
usage: Either proved or proven is standard as the past participle of prove. As a modifier, proven is by far the more common: a proven fact.

prove

  • probe, prove, probable - Latin probare, "approve, prove, test," is the source of English probe and prove. From that came Latin probabilis, "provable," which became English probable.
  • sooth, soothsayer, soothe - Sooth, "true, truth," or "that which is," is part of soothsayer; it is related to soothe, which once meant "assent to be true; say yes to," or "to prove or show a fact to be true."
  • approve - Its original sense was "prove, demonstrate."
  • rebut, refute - To rebut a statement is to offer clear evidence or a reasoned argument against it; to refute a statement is to prove it wrong (neither means "contradict" or "deny").

prove

test
1. 'prove'

If you prove that something is true or correct, you provide evidence showing that it is definitely true or correct.

He was able to prove that he was an American.
Tests proved that the bullet was not fired from a police weapon.
2. 'test'

When you use a practical method to try to find out how good or bad someone or something is, don't say that you 'prove' them. Say that you test them.

I will test you on your knowledge of French.
A number of new techniques were tested.

prove


Past participle: proven
Gerund: proving

Imperative
prove
prove
Present
I prove
you prove
he/she/it proves
we prove
you prove
they prove
Preterite
I proved
you proved
he/she/it proved
we proved
you proved
they proved
Present Continuous
I am proving
you are proving
he/she/it is proving
we are proving
you are proving
they are proving
Present Perfect
I have proven
you have proven
he/she/it has proven
we have proven
you have proven
they have proven
Past Continuous
I was proving
you were proving
he/she/it was proving
we were proving
you were proving
they were proving
Past Perfect
I had proven
you had proven
he/she/it had proven
we had proven
you had proven
they had proven
Future
I will prove
you will prove
he/she/it will prove
we will prove
you will prove
they will prove
Future Perfect
I will have proven
you will have proven
he/she/it will have proven
we will have proven
you will have proven
they will have proven
Future Continuous
I will be proving
you will be proving
he/she/it will be proving
we will be proving
you will be proving
they will be proving
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been proving
you have been proving
he/she/it has been proving
we have been proving
you have been proving
they have been proving
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been proving
you will have been proving
he/she/it will have been proving
we will have been proving
you will have been proving
they will have been proving
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been proving
you had been proving
he/she/it had been proving
we had been proving
you had been proving
they had been proving
Conditional
I would prove
you would prove
he/she/it would prove
we would prove
you would prove
they would prove
Past Conditional
I would have proven
you would have proven
he/she/it would have proven
we would have proven
you would have proven
they would have proven

prove

To allow a yeast dough to rise and expand by leaving it to rest in a warm place.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.prove - be shown or be found to beprove - be shown or be found to be; "She proved to be right"; "The medicine turned out to save her life"; "She turned up HIV positive"
be - have the quality of being; (copula, used with an adjective or a predicate noun); "John is rich"; "This is not a good answer"
ensue, result - issue or terminate (in a specified way, state, etc.); end; "result in tragedy"
2.prove - establish the validity of something, as by an example, explanation or experiment; "The experiment demonstrated the instability of the compound"; "The mathematician showed the validity of the conjecture"
prove oneself - show one's ability or courage
prove - prove formally; demonstrate by a mathematical, formal proof
affirm, confirm, corroborate, substantiate, support, sustain - establish or strengthen as with new evidence or facts; "his story confirmed my doubts"; "The evidence supports the defendant"
negate, contradict - prove negative; show to be false
stultify - prove to be of unsound mind or demonstrate someone's incompetence; "nobody is legally allowed to stultify himself"
confute, disprove - prove to be false; "The physicist disproved his colleagues' theories"
3.prove - provide evidence for; "The blood test showed that he was the father"; "Her behavior testified to her incompetence"
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
attest, certify, evidence, manifest, demonstrate - provide evidence for; stand as proof of; show by one's behavior, attitude, or external attributes; "His high fever attested to his illness"; "The buildings in Rome manifest a high level of architectural sophistication"; "This decision demonstrates his sense of fairness"
inform - impart knowledge of some fact, state or affairs, or event to; "I informed him of his rights"
presume - constitute reasonable evidence for; "A restaurant bill presumes the consumption of food"
abduce, adduce, cite - advance evidence for
4.prove - prove formally; demonstrate by a mathematical, formal proof
math, mathematics, maths - a science (or group of related sciences) dealing with the logic of quantity and shape and arrangement
shew, show, demonstrate, prove, establish - establish the validity of something, as by an example, explanation or experiment; "The experiment demonstrated the instability of the compound"; "The mathematician showed the validity of the conjecture"
5.prove - put to the test, as for its quality, or give experimental use toprove - put to the test, as for its quality, or give experimental use to; "This approach has been tried with good results"; "Test this recipe"
pass judgment, evaluate, judge - form a critical opinion of; "I cannot judge some works of modern art"; "How do you evaluate this grant proposal?" "We shouldn't pass judgment on other people"
verify, control - check or regulate (a scientific experiment) by conducting a parallel experiment or comparing with another standard; "Are you controlling for the temperature?"
float - circulate or discuss tentatively; test the waters with; "The Republicans are floating the idea of a tax reform"
field-test - test something under the conditions under which it will actually be used; "The Army field tested the new tanks"
6.prove - increase in volume; "the dough rose slowly in the warm room"
grow - become larger, greater, or bigger; expand or gain; "The problem grew too large for me"; "Her business grew fast"
7.prove - cause to puff up with a leaven; "unleavened bread"
lift, raise, elevate, get up, bring up - raise from a lower to a higher position; "Raise your hands"; "Lift a load"
8.prove - take a trial impression of
print, impress - reproduce by printing
9.prove - obtain probate of; "prove a will"
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
authenticate - establish the authenticity of something

prove

verb
1. turn out, come out, end up, be found to be In the past this process has proved difficult.
prove yourself show yourself, demonstrate your ability Now's your chance to prove yourself. She proved herself to be a good mother.

prove

verb
2. To subject to a procedure that ascertains effectiveness, value, proper function, or other quality:
Idioms: bring to the test, make trial of, put to the proof.
3. Archaic. To participate in or partake of personally:
Translations
يُبَرْهِنيَتَّضِح، يَتَبَيَّن أنَّهيُثَبِّت
ukázat sedokázatukázat
bevise
tõestama
todistaanäyttää toteen
dokazati
bukti
reynastsanna
立証する証明する
입증하다
įrodytasįrodyti
izrādītiespierādīt
dokazati
bevisajäsavisa
พิสูจน์
kanıtlamakanlaşılmak-duğu ortaya çıkmakispat etmek
chứng minh

prove

[pruːv] (proved (pt) (proved or proven (pp)))
A. VT
1. (= give proof of) [+ theory, statement] → demostrar, probar; (one's love, loyalty, strength) → demostrar
my son was murdered, and I'm going to prove ita mi hijo lo asesinaron, y voy a demostrarlo or probarlo
can you prove it?¿lo puede demostrar or probar?
statistics never prove anythinglas estadísticas nunca prueban or demuestran nada
you say you love me, so prove itdices que me quieres, pues demuéstralo or pruébalo
he wanted to prove his love for herquería demostrar su amor por ella
you can't prove anything against meusted no tiene ninguna prueba en mi contrausted no puede demostrar or probar nada en mi contra
it just proves how stupid he issimplemente demuestra or prueba lo tonto que es
to prove sb's innocence, prove sb innocentdemostrar or probar la inocencia de algn
to prove one's pointdemostrar que uno está en lo cierto or tiene razón
she took him to court just to prove a pointlo llevó a los tribunales simplemente para demostrar or probar que estaba en lo cierto or que ella tenía razón
to prove sb rightdemostrar que algn tiene razón
he was proved right in the endal fin se demostró que tenía razón
it's been scientifically proven or provedse ha probado or demostrado científicamente, ha sido probado or demostrado científicamente
to prove thatdemostrar que, probar que
that proves that she did iteso demuestra or prueba que ella lo hizo
she wants to prove to herself that she can still hold down a jobquiere demostrarse a sí misma que todavía puede mantener un trabajo
what are you trying to prove?¿qué intentas demostrar or probar?
it's difficult to prove what's going ones difícil demostrar or probar lo que está pasando
whether he was right remains to be provedaún falta por demostrar or probar si tenía razón
to prove sb wrongdemostrar que algn está equivocado
everyone said that we would fail but we proved them wrongtodo el mundo decía que fracasaríamos, pero demostramos que estaban equivocados
she attempted to prove their theory wrongintentó encontrar pruebas que demostraran que su teoría estaba equivocada
the exception proves the rulela excepción confirma la regla
2. (= verify) → comprobar
you can prove how effective this method is by trying it out yourselfpuede comprobar la eficacia de este método probándolo usted mismo
3.
to prove o.s.demostrar lo que uno vale
you don't need to prove yourselfno tienes que demostrar lo que vales
he has proved himself worthy of our trustha demostrado ser digno de nuestra confianza
he has proved himself to be a successful managerha demostrado ser un gerente eficaz
4. (= test out) → poner a prueba, someter a prueba
5. (Jur)
to prove a willhomologar un testamento
B. VI
1. (= turn out) → resultar
it proved (to be) usefulresultó (ser) útil
if it proves (to be) otherwisesi resulta (ser) lo contrario
it may prove difficult to secure fundingpuede que resulte difícil conseguir fondos
the news proved falseresultó que la noticia era falsa
the temptation proved too much for herla tentación resultó demasiado grande para ellano pudo resistir la tentación
2. (Culin) [dough] → leudarse

prove

[ˈpruːv]
vt [+ theory] → prouver
The police couldn't prove it → La police n'a pas pu le prouver.
This proves nothing! → Cela ne prouve rien !
to prove (that) ... [evidence, results] → prouver que ...
to prove sb right → donner raison à qn
History will prove him right → L'histoire lui donnera raison.
History will prove him to have been right all along → L'histoire prouvera qu'il avait raison depuis le début.
He was proved right in the end
BUT Il s'est avéré qu'il avait raison.
to prove sb wrong → donner tort à qn
I was determined to prove him wrong → J'étais décidé à lui donner tort.
BUT J'étais décidé à prouver qu'il avait tort.
to prove o.s. → montrer ce dont on est capable
to prove o.s. useful → s'avérer utile
to prove o.s. to be sth → s'avérer être qch
Margaret proved herself to be a good mother → Margaret s'est avérée être une bonne mère.
vi
to prove correct, to prove to be correct → s'avérer juste
to prove useful, to prove to be useful → s'avérer utile
to prove difficult, to prove to be difficult → s'avérer difficile

prove

pret <proved>, ptp <proved or proven>
vt
(= verify)beweisen; willbeglaubigen; he proved that she did iter bewies or er wies nach, dass sie das getan hat; to prove somebody innocent or somebody’s innocencejds Unschuld beweisen or nachweisen; to prove something against somebodyjdm etwas nachweisen; whether his judgement was right remains to be proved or provenes muss sich erst noch erweisen, ob seine Beurteilung zutrifft; it all goes to prove that …das beweist mal wieder, dass …; he was proved right in the ender hat schließlich doch recht behalten
(= test out, put to the proof) rifle, aircraft etcerproben; one’s worth, courageunter Beweis stellen, beweisen; he did it just to prove a pointer tat es nur der Sache wegen
(Cook) doughgehen lassen
vi
(Cook: dough) → gehen
(= turn out) to prove (to be) hot/useful etcsich als heiß/nützlich etc erweisen; if it proves otherwisewenn sich das Gegenteil herausstellt
vr
(= show one’s value, courage etc)sich bewähren
to prove oneself innocent/indispensable etcsich als unschuldig/unentbehrlich etc erweisen

prove

[pruːv] (proved (pt) (proved or proven (pp))) [ˈpruːvn]
1. vt
a. (verify) → provare, dimostrare
to prove sb innocent → provare or dimostrare l'innocenza di qn
he was proved right in the end → alla fine i fatti gli hanno dato ragione
b. (put to the test, courage, usefulness) → dimostrare, mettere alla prova
to prove o.s. → dar prova di sé
c. (turn out) to prove (to be) usefulrivelarsi utile
to prove correct → risultare vero/a
if it proves (to be) otherwise → dovesse rivelarsi altrimenti
2. vi = vt c

prove

(pruːv) verb
1. to show to be true or correct. This fact proves his guilt; He was proved guilty; Can you prove your theory?
2. to turn out, or be found, to be. His suspicions proved (to be) correct; This tool proved very useful.
ˈproven adjective
(especially in law) proved.

prove

يُثَبِّت ukázat se bevise beweisen αποδεικνύω probar todistaa s’avérer dokazati dimostrarsi 立証する 입증하다 bewijzen bevise udowodnić provar доказывать jäsa พิสูจน์ kanıtlamak chứng minh 证明

prove

v. demostrar, comprobar, probar.
References in classic literature ?
The big house did prove a Palace Beautiful, though it took some time for all to get in, and Beth found it very hard to pass the lions.
Some time it may prove to be a door, a great open door to you.
Celina's husband was a fool, a coward, and a pig, and to prove it to her, Victor intended to hammer his head into a jelly the next time he encountered him.
Let us then hope that this Mohican may not disappoint our wishes, but prove what his looks assert him to be, a brave and constant friend.
But, taking the inward and outward history of the first half-day into consideration, Hepzibah began to fear that the shop would prove her ruin in a moral and religious point of view, without contributing very essentially towards even her temporal welfare.
Hast thou enticed me into a bond that will prove the ruin of my soul?
Yet if I had not indulged, to prove there was nothing in it, in this review, I should have missed the two or three dim elements of comfort that still remained to me.
Though at the time I but ill comprehended not a few of his words, yet subsequent disclosures, when I had become more familiar with his broken phraseology, now enable me to present the whole story such as it may prove in the mere skeleton I give.
But his coming for me as he did, with such active, such ready friendship, is enough to prove him one of the worthiest of men.
All the beauty that has ever been in the world has broken the laws of all previous beauty, and unwillingly dictated laws to the beauty that succeeded it,--laws which that beauty has no less spiritedly broken, to prove in turn dictator to its successor.
In that case, Antonio, thou mayest as well do us the pleasure of singing a little, that the gentleman, our guest, may see that even in the mountains and woods there are musicians: we have told him of thy accomplishments, and we want thee to show them and prove that we say true; so, as thou livest, pray sit down and sing that ballad about thy love that thy uncle the prebendary made thee, and that was so much liked in the town.
The observation, if it prove any thing, would prove that there ought to be no judges distinct from that body.