proved


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prove

 (pro͞ov)
v. proved, proved or prov·en (pro͞o′vən), prov·ing, proves
v.tr.
1.
a. To establish the truth or validity of (something) by the presentation of argument or evidence: The novel proves that the essayist can write in more than one genre. The storm proved him to be wrong in his prediction.
b. To demonstrate the reality of (something): He proved his strength by doing 50 pushups.
c. To show (oneself) to be what is specified or to have a certain characteristic: proved herself to be a formidable debater; proved herself to be worthy of the task.
2. Law
a. To establish by the required amount of evidence: proved his case in court.
b. To establish the authenticity of (a will).
3. Mathematics
a. To demonstrate the validity of (a hypothesis or proposition).
b. To verify (the result of a calculation).
4. To subject (a gun, for instance) to a test.
5. Printing To make a sample impression of (type); proof.
6. Archaic To find out or learn (something) through experience.
v.intr.
To be shown to be such; turn out: a theory that proved impractical in practice; a schedule that proved to be too demanding.
Phrasal Verb:
prove out
To turn out well; succeed.

[Middle English proven, from Old French prover, from Latin probāre, to test, from probus, good; see per in Indo-European roots.]

prov′a·bil′i·ty, prov′a·ble·ness n.
prov′a·ble adj.
prov′a·bly adv.
prov′er n.
Usage Note: Prove has two past participles: proved and proven. Proved is the older form. Proven is a variant. The Middle English spellings of prove included preven, a form that died out in England but survived in Scotland, and the past participle proven probably rose by analogy with verbs like weave, woven and cleave, cloven. Proven was originally used in Scottish legal contexts, such as The jury ruled that the charges were not proven. In the 1900s, proven made inroads into the territory once dominated by proved, so that now the two forms compete on equal footing as participles. However, when used as an adjective before a noun, proven is now the more common word: a proven talent.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.proved - established beyond doubt; "a proven liar"; "a Soviet leader of proven shrewdness"
unproved, unproven - not proved; "unproved allegations"; "unproved assumptions"
References in classic literature ?
Of course I'm not," exclaimed Sallie, with an air that proved the contrary.
When the alarm that had tricked them into mar- riage proved to be groundless, she was angry and said bitter, hurtful things.
Ned was right, as he proved for himself a little later, when, Mr.
The coffee and the biscuit accompanying it proved very acceptable to Edna, who had declined refreshment at Madame Lebrun's and was now beginning to feel hungry.
The rock proved softer on each side of us, and so they left the center of the river bare and dry, first working out these two little holes for us to hide in.
The savage, perceiving their defenceless situation, without offering violence to the family attempted to captivate the Negro, who, happily proved an over-match for him, threw him on the ground, and, in the struggle, the mother of the children drew an ax from a corner of the cottage, and cut his head off, while her little daughter shut the door.
So it proved with poor Hepzibah; for, when she saw the young man's smile,--looking so much the brighter on a thoughtful face,--and heard his kindly tone, she broke first into a hysteric giggle and then began to sob.
The chief tragic event of the old man's life, so far as I could judge, was his mishap with a certain goose, which lived and died some twenty or forty years ago: a goose of most promising figure, but which, at table, proved so inveterately tough, that the carving-knife would make no impression on its carcase, and it could only be divided with an axe and handsaw.
On the eleventh night after my latest encounter with that gentleman-- they were all numbered now--I had an alarm that perilously skirted it and that indeed, from the particular quality of its unexpectedness, proved quite my sharpest shock.
Dashwood's looks and spirits proved her to be, as she repeatedly declared herself, one of the happiest women in the world.
I will merely say that I don't give up your cause as utterly lost, until the conviction now impressed on my own mind is proved to be wrong.
Sancho did as he bade him, but one of the goatherds, seeing the wound, told him not to be uneasy, as he would apply a remedy with which it would be soon healed; and gathering some leaves of rosemary, of which there was a great quantity there, he chewed them and mixed them with a little salt, and applying them to the ear he secured them firmly with a bandage, assuring him that no other treatment would be required, and so it proved.