proved


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prove

 (pro͞ov)
v. proved, proved or prov·en (pro͞o′vən), prov·ing, proves
v.tr.
1.
a. To establish the truth or validity of (something) by the presentation of argument or evidence: The novel proves that the essayist can write in more than one genre. The storm proved him to be wrong in his prediction.
b. To demonstrate the reality of (something): He proved his strength by doing 50 pushups.
c. To show (oneself) to be what is specified or to have a certain characteristic: proved herself to be a formidable debater; proved herself to be worthy of the task.
2. Law
a. To establish by the required amount of evidence: proved his case in court.
b. To establish the authenticity of (a will).
3. Mathematics
a. To demonstrate the validity of (a hypothesis or proposition).
b. To verify (the result of a calculation).
4. To subject (a gun, for instance) to a test.
5. Printing To make a sample impression of (type); proof.
6. Archaic To find out or learn (something) through experience.
v.intr.
To be shown to be such; turn out: a theory that proved impractical in practice; a schedule that proved to be too demanding.
Phrasal Verb:
prove out
To turn out well; succeed.

[Middle English proven, from Old French prover, from Latin probāre, to test, from probus, good; see per in Indo-European roots.]

prov′a·bil′i·ty, prov′a·ble·ness n.
prov′a·ble adj.
prov′a·bly adv.
prov′er n.
Usage Note: Prove has two past participles: proved and proven. Proved is the older form. Proven is a variant. The Middle English spellings of prove included preven, a form that died out in England but survived in Scotland, and the past participle proven probably rose by analogy with verbs like weave, woven and cleave, cloven. Proven was originally used in Scottish legal contexts, such as The jury ruled that the charges were not proven. In the 1900s, proven made inroads into the territory once dominated by proved, so that now the two forms compete on equal footing as participles. However, when used as an adjective before a noun, proven is now the more common word: a proven talent.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.proved - established beyond doubt; "a proven liar"; "a Soviet leader of proven shrewdness"
unproved, unproven - not proved; "unproved allegations"; "unproved assumptions"
References in classic literature ?
You will remember that I was held responsible for it, and that my innocence was never proved.
The Witnesses proved, without error or flaw, That the sty was deserted when found: And the Judge kept explaining the state of the law In a soft under-current of sound.
The fact of Desertion I will not dispute; But its guilt, as I trust, is removed(So far as related to the costs of this suit) By the Alibi which has been proved.
I suspect, gentlemen, that you are looking at me with compassion; you tell me again that an enlightened and developed man, such, in short, as the future man will be, cannot consciously desire anything disadvantageous to himself, that that can be proved mathematically.
And that is not all: even if man really were nothing but a piano-key, even if this were proved to him by natural science and mathematics, even then he would not become reasonable, but would purposely do something perverse out of simple ingratitude, simply to gain his point.
What had happened was that news (which afterwards proved to be false) had been received during the night of a movement by the French to outflank the Drissa camp.
And we may further grant to those of her defenders who are lovers of poetry and yet not poets the permission to speak in prose on her behalf: let them show not only that she is pleasant but also useful to States and to human life, and we will listen in a kindly spirit; for if this can be proved we shall surely be the gainers--I mean, if there is a use in poetry as well as a delight?
Abandoning a species of inquiry that proved so fruitless, he retraced his steps to the council-lodge, resolved to seek and question David, in order to put an end to his doubts.
And, on certain occasions in the experience of Cecilia and her sister, the most indulgent of fathers proved to be as capable of saying No, as the sternest tyrant who ever ruled a fireside.
It came to anchor in Baker's Bay, and proved to be a ship of war.
On doubts being expressed as to the correctness of this method, they immediately proved that not only was the mean distance 234,347 miles, but that astronomers could not possibly be in error in their estimate by more than seventy miles either way.
If he committed himself to a decision at all, and if the decision was favourable, the strength of our case was as good as proved from that moment.