proverb


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prov·erb

 (prŏv′ûrb′)
n.
1. A short pithy saying in frequent and widespread use that expresses a basic truth or practical precept.
2. Proverbs (used with a sing. verb) See Table at Bible.

[Middle English proverbe, from Old French, from Latin prōverbium : prō-, forth; see pro-1 + verbum, word; see wer- in Indo-European roots.]

proverb

(ˈprɒvɜːb)
n
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a short, memorable, and often highly condensed saying embodying, esp with bold imagery, some commonplace fact or experience
2. a person or thing exemplary in respect of a characteristic: Antarctica is a proverb for extreme cold.
3. (Ecclesiastical Terms) ecclesiast a wise saying or admonition providing guidance
vb (tr)
4. to utter or describe (something) in the form of a proverb
5. to make (something) a proverb
[C14: via Old French from Latin prōverbium, from verbum word]

pro′-verb`



n.
a word that can substitute for a verb or verb phrase, as do in They never attend meetings, but I do.
[1905–10]

prov•erb

(ˈprɒv ərb)

n.
1. a short popular saying, usu. of unknown and ancient origin, that expresses effectively some commonplace truth or useful thought; adage; saw.
2. a person or thing commonly regarded as an embodiment or representation of some quality; byword.
3. a profound Biblical saying, maxim, or oracular utterance requiring interpretation.
[1275–1325; Middle English proverbe < Middle French < Latin prōverbium=prō- pro-1 + verb(um) word + -ium -ium1]

proverb


Past participle: proverbed
Gerund: proverbing

Imperative
proverb
proverb
Present
I proverb
you proverb
he/she/it proverbs
we proverb
you proverb
they proverb
Preterite
I proverbed
you proverbed
he/she/it proverbed
we proverbed
you proverbed
they proverbed
Present Continuous
I am proverbing
you are proverbing
he/she/it is proverbing
we are proverbing
you are proverbing
they are proverbing
Present Perfect
I have proverbed
you have proverbed
he/she/it has proverbed
we have proverbed
you have proverbed
they have proverbed
Past Continuous
I was proverbing
you were proverbing
he/she/it was proverbing
we were proverbing
you were proverbing
they were proverbing
Past Perfect
I had proverbed
you had proverbed
he/she/it had proverbed
we had proverbed
you had proverbed
they had proverbed
Future
I will proverb
you will proverb
he/she/it will proverb
we will proverb
you will proverb
they will proverb
Future Perfect
I will have proverbed
you will have proverbed
he/she/it will have proverbed
we will have proverbed
you will have proverbed
they will have proverbed
Future Continuous
I will be proverbing
you will be proverbing
he/she/it will be proverbing
we will be proverbing
you will be proverbing
they will be proverbing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been proverbing
you have been proverbing
he/she/it has been proverbing
we have been proverbing
you have been proverbing
they have been proverbing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been proverbing
you will have been proverbing
he/she/it will have been proverbing
we will have been proverbing
you will have been proverbing
they will have been proverbing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been proverbing
you had been proverbing
he/she/it had been proverbing
we had been proverbing
you had been proverbing
they had been proverbing
Conditional
I would proverb
you would proverb
he/she/it would proverb
we would proverb
you would proverb
they would proverb
Past Conditional
I would have proverbed
you would have proverbed
he/she/it would have proverbed
we would have proverbed
you would have proverbed
they would have proverbed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.proverb - a condensed but memorable saying embodying some important fact of experience that is taken as true by many people
locution, saying, expression - a word or phrase that particular people use in particular situations; "pardon the expression"

proverb

noun saying, saw, maxim, gnome, adage, dictum, aphorism, byword, apophthegm the old proverb `where there's a will, there's a way`

proverb

noun
A usually pithy and familiar statement expressing an observation or principle generally accepted as wise or true:
Translations
مَثَلمَثَل، قَوْل مأثور
přísloví
ordsprogtalemåde
vanasõna
sananlaskusanonta
poslovica
közmondás
málsháttur
ことわざ
격언
kaip sakomapatarlėtapęs priežodžiu
parunasakāmvārds
príslovie
pregovor
poslovica
ordspråk
สุภาษิต
tục ngữ

proverb

[ˈprɒvɜːb] Nrefrán m, proverbio m

proverb

[ˈprɒvɜːrb] nproverbe m

proverb

nSprichwort nt; (the Book of) Proverbsdie Sprüche pl

proverb

[ˈprɒvɜːb] nproverbio

proverb

(ˈprovəːb) noun
a well-known saying that gives good advice or expresses a supposed truth. Two common proverbs are `Many hands make light work' and `Don't count your chickens before they're hatched!'
proˈverbial adjective
proˈverbially adverb

proverb

مَثَل přísloví talemåde Sprichwort παροιμία refrán sananlasku proverbe poslovica proverbio ことわざ 격언 gezegde ordspråk przysłowie provérbio пословица ordspråk สุภาษิต atasözü tục ngữ 谚语
References in classic literature ?
William Penn was termed Minquon by the Delawares, and, as he never used violence or injustice in his dealings with them, his reputation for probity passed into a proverb.
However curious it may seem for an oil-ship to be borrowing oil on the whale-ground, and however much it may invertedly contradict the old proverb about carrying coals to Newcastle, yet sometimes such a thing really happens; and in the present case Captain Derick De Deer did indubitably conduct a lamp-feeder as Flask did declare.
The proverb says, "`They that cannot govern themselves cannot govern others.
Having already had more than a taste of them in the house of my old master, and having endured them there, I very naturally inferred my ability to endure them elsewhere, and especially at Baltimore; for I had something of the feeling about Baltimore that is expressed in the proverb, that "being hanged in England is preferable to dying a natural death in Ireland.
Norah, whose fondness for reading had passed into a family proverb, took up book after book from table and shelf, and laid them down again, in despair of fixing her attention.
The proverb says, "You can't make a silk purse out of a sow's ear.
First, notwithstanding the proverb that constant dropping will wear away a stone, you may set your mind at rest that these people never will - never would, in hundred years - impair your ground with Miss Havisham, in any particular, great or small.
If this be the habitation of a thief, it makes good the old proverb, The nearer the church the farther from God.
I do not believe that saying, because I believe another one to the effect that hell is paved with benevolence, which most people, the proverb being too deep for them, misinterpret as unfulfilled intentions.
The captain understood my raillery very well, and merrily replied with the old English proverb, "that he doubted mine eyes were bigger than my belly, for he did not observe my stomach so good, although I had fasted all day;" and, continuing in his mirth, protested "he would have gladly given a hundred pounds, to have seen my closet in the eagle's bill, and afterwards in its fall from so great a height into the sea; which would certainly have been a most astonishing object, worthy to have the description of it transmitted to future ages:" and the comparison of Phaeton was so obvious, that he could not forbear applying it, although I did not much admire the conceit.
But, Commander of the Faithful, there is a proverb that says, "the more one has, the more one wants.
But there is a proverb which says that ill-gotten gains never prosper, and the Prince found that the stolen ring brought him ill-luck after all.