provost court


Also found in: Thesaurus.

provost court

n.
A military tribunal convened in occupied territory, especially one with jurisdiction over lesser criminal offenses committed by civilians.

[provost, military police officer + court.]

provost court

(prəˈvəʊ)
n
1. (Military) a military court for trying people charged with minor offences in an occupied area
2. (Law) a military court for trying people charged with minor offences in an occupied area

pro′vost court`

(ˈproʊ voʊ)
n.
(in occupied territory) a military court, usu. composed of one officer, empowered to try military personnel and civilians for minor offenses.
[1860–65]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.provost court - a military court for trying people charged with minor offenses in an occupied area
armed forces, armed services, military, military machine, war machine - the military forces of a nation; "their military is the largest in the region"; "the military machine is the same one we faced in 1991 but now it is weaker"
military court - a judicial court of commissioned officers for the discipline and punishment of military personnel
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
He then joined the 5th Missouri Volunteer Infantry and deployed to the Philippines, where his legal skills resulted in his being first assigned as a Judge of the Inferior Provost Court and later as a Judge of the Superior Provost Court of Manila.
He subsequently served as a judge on the first Provost Court organized in the Philippines under military occupation.
Fred Spurlock, a black American, was brought before a provost court and charged with assaulting a civilian policeman.
He was tried and sentenced to imprisonment by a provost court for assaulting two Marine sentries on duty at the Navy Yard.
citizen, was arrested by the military and brought before the provost court on a charge of embezzlement.
In holding that the provost court lacked jurisdiction either over White or the subject matter of his case, McLaughlin relied on both Milligan and Quirin to insist that courts in time of war or peace have an obligation to preserve the safeguards of civil liberty.
1) The other is Department of the Army Pamphlet 27-9-2, Military Judges' Benchbook for Provost Courts (Provost Court Benchbook).
7) By contrast, the Provost Court Benchbook contains no instructions for offenses or defenses.
sections] 821 ("The provisions of [the UCMJ] conferring jurisdiction upon courts-martial do not deprive military commissions, provost courts, or other military tribunals of concurrent jurisdiction with respect to offenders or offenses that by statute or by the law of war may be tried by military commissions, provost courts, or other military tribunals.
The provisions of this chapter conferring jurisdiction upon courts martial do not deprive military commissions, provost courts, or other military tribunals of concurrent jurisdiction with respect to offenders or offenses that by statute or by the law of war may be tried by military commissions, provost courts, or other military tribunals.
Although the Manual is, as its title indicates, directed to courts-martial, its short preamble contains the following language regarding military commissions and provost courts: "Subject to any applicable rule of international law or to any regulations prescribed by the President or by other competent authority, military commissions and provost courts shall be guided by the appropriate principles of law and rules of procedure[] and evidence prescribed for courts-martial.
The Army's 1928 Manual included a similar clause providing that military commissions and provost courts "are summary in their nature, but so far as not otherwise provided have usually been guided by the applicable rules of procedure and of evidence prescribed for courts-martial.