prow


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prow

 (prou)
n.
1. Nautical The forward part of a ship's hull; the bow.
2. A projecting forward part, such as the front end of a ski.

[French proue, from Old French, from Italian dialectal prua, from Vulgar Latin *prōda, alteration of Latin prōra, from Greek prōira; see per in Indo-European roots.]

prow

(praʊ)
n
(Nautical Terms) the bow of a vessel
[C16: from Old French proue, from Latin prōra, from Greek prōira; related to Latin prō in front]

prow1

(praʊ)

n.
1. the forepart of a ship or boat; bow.
2. a similar projecting forepart, as the nose of an airplane.
[1545–55; < Middle French proue < Upper Italian (Genoese) prua < Latin prōra < Greek prôira]

prow2

(praʊ)

adj.
Archaic. valiant.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Old French prou < Vulgar Latin *prōdis. See proud]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.prow - front part of a vessel or aircraftprow - front part of a vessel or aircraft; "he pointed the bow of the boat toward the finish line"
front - the side that is seen or that goes first
vessel, watercraft - a craft designed for water transportation

prow

noun bow(s), head, front, nose, stem, fore, sharp end (jocular), forepart the prow of the ship
Translations
مُقَدَّم السَّفينَه
proa
příď
bovstævn
stefni
prorarostrum
pirmagalys
priekšgals
burungeminin baş tarafıpruva

prow

[praʊ] N (Naut) → proa f

prow

[ˈpraʊ] n [ship] → proue f

prow

nBug m

prow

[praʊ] nprua

prow

(prau) noun
the front part of a ship; the bow.
References in classic literature ?
Determined to keep as far apart as possible, the one seated himself in the stem, and the other in the prow of the ship.
His mighty strokes bade fair to close up the distance between us in short order, for at best I could make but slow progress with my unfamiliar craft, which nosed stubbornly in every direction but that which I desired to follow, so that fully half my energy was expended in turning its blunt prow back into the course.
Embedded in the prow of the skiff lay the spear that had been cast after me by him whom I suddenly desired to save.
Yes, the world's a ship on its passage out, and not a voyage complete; and the pulpit is its prow.
A foreign friend once pointed it out to me, in the skeleton of a foe he had slain, and with the vertebrae of which he was inlaying, in a sort of basso-relievo, the beaked prow of his canoe.
The commander of the first Roman galley must have looked with an intense absorption upon the estuary of the Thames as he turned the beaked prow of his ship to the westward under the brow of the North Foreland.
She has shown herself the sweetest craft that ever floated, and I mean to decorate her prow with the handsomest image that the skill of man can cut out of timber.
Whether it were the monarch himself, or some famous British admiral or general, or the governor of the province, or perchance the favorite daughter of the ship-owner, there the image stood above the prow, decked out in gorgeous colors, magnificently gilded, and staring the whole world out of countenance, as if from an innate consciousness of its own superiority.
Every instant I expected to feel my prow crash against solid rock.
Swinging the prow of my boat toward the right, I sought the river's rocky side, and there I lay while Matai Shang and Thurid approached up the center of the stream, which was much narrower than the Iss.
Number Thirteen reached the water's edge but a moment after the prow of the rajah's craft had cleared the shore and was swinging up stream under the vigorous strokes of its fifty oarsmen.
Then he shoved the boat out into the river, jumping aboard himself as its prow cleared the gravelly beach.