prowess


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prow·ess

 (prou′ĭs)
n.
1. Superior skill or ability.
2. Superior strength, courage, or daring, especially in battle.

[Middle English prowesse, from Old French proesse, from prud, prou, brave; see proud.]

prowess

(ˈpraʊɪs)
n
1. outstanding or superior skill or ability
2. bravery or fearlessness, esp in battle
[C13: from Old French proesce, from prou good; see proud]

prow•ess

(ˈpraʊ ɪs)

n.
1. exceptional ability, skill, or strength.
2. exceptional valor or bravery, esp. in combat or battle.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Old French proesse, proece goodness, bravery =prou prow2 + -esse < Latin -itia -ice]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.prowess - a superior skill that you can learn by study and practice and observationprowess - a superior skill that you can learn by study and practice and observation; "the art of conversation"; "it's quite an art"
airmanship, aviation - the art of operating aircraft
eristic - the art of logical disputation (especially if specious)
falconry - the art of training falcons to hunt and return
fortification - the art or science of strengthening defenses
homiletics - the art of preaching
horology - the art of designing and making clocks
minstrelsy - the art of a minstrel
musicianship - artistry in performing music
enology, oenology - the art of wine making
puppetry - the art of making puppets and presenting puppet shows
taxidermy - the art of mounting the skins of animals so that they have lifelike appearance
telescopy - the art of making and using telescopes
ventriloquism, ventriloquy - the art of projecting your voice so that it seems to come from another source (as from a ventriloquist's dummy)
superior skill - more than ordinary ability

prowess

prowess

noun
1. Skillfulness in the use of the hands or body:
2. The quality or state of being heroic:
Translations
بَراعَه، مَهارَة، قُدْرَه
obratnostzdatnost
overlegenhed
hæfni, hæfileiki
prasmeveiklība
zdatnosť

prowess

[ˈpraʊɪs] N
1. (= skill) → habilidad f, capacidad f
2. (= courage) → valor m

prowess

[ˈpraʊəs] nprouesses fpl
his prowess as a footballer → ses prouesses de footballeur
sexual prowess → prouesses sexuelles

prowess

n (= skill)Fähigkeiten pl, → Können nt; (= courage)Tapferkeit f; his (sexual) prowessseine Potenz, seine Manneskraft

prowess

[ˈpraʊɪs] n (skill) his prowess as a footballerle sue capacità di calciatore

prowess

(ˈprauis) noun
skill or ability. athletic prowess.
References in classic literature ?
They soon began to boast of their respective superiority to each other in strength and prowess.
On one of these too frequent occasions he was boasting of his prowess as a pedestrian and athlete, and the outcome was a match against nature.
The Amazon Penthesileia, the daughter of Ares and of Thracian race, comes to aid the Trojans, and after showing great prowess, is killed by Achilles and buried by the Trojans.
The most conspicuously situated lady in that massed flower-bed of feminine show and finery inclined her head by way of assent, and then the spokesman of the prisoners delivered himself and his fellows into her hands for free pardon, ransom, captivity, or death, as she in her good pleasure might elect; and this, as he said, he was doing by command of Sir Kay the Senes- chal, whose prisoners they were, he having vanquished them by his single might and prowess in sturdy conflict in the field.
A great boaster was he withal, and to-day he strutted about on one of these corner stages, and vaunted of his prowess, and offered to crack any man's crown for a shilling.
He said good-bye to him at the station on their return from a bear hunt, at which they had had a display of Russian prowess kept up all night.
For all my prowess I cannot break through the wall and open a way to the ships single-handed.
But if one national government, had not so regulated the navigation of Britain as to make it a nursery for seamen -- if one national government had not called forth all the national means and materials for forming fleets, their prowess and their thunder would never have been celebrated.
Evidently devoid of all the finer sentiments of friendship, love, or affection, these people fairly worship physical prowess and bravery, and nothing is too good for the object of their adoration as long as he maintains his position by repeated examples of his skill, strength, and courage.
As Jimmie and his friend exchanged tales descriptive of their prowess, Maggie leaned back in the shadow.
The Omahas were once one of the numerous and powerful tribes of the prairies, vying in warlike might and prowess with the Sioux, the Pawnees, the Sauks, the Konsas, and the Iatans.
That I could scale them I knew full well, but Tars Tarkas, with his mighty bulk and enormous weight, would find it a task possibly quite beyond his prowess or his skill, for Martians are at best but poor climbers.