proximate


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Related to proximate: proximate analysis

prox·i·mate

 (prŏk′sə-mĭt)
adj.
1. Direct or immediate: "The stock market crash in October, 1929 ... is often regarded as ... the major proximate cause of the Great Depression" (Milton Friedman)."The proximate cause of America's deficits is that Washington has dramatically cut the taxes of America's rich" (Eamonn Fingleton).
2. Very near or next, as in space, time, or order. See Synonyms at close.

[Latin proximātus, past participle of proximāre, to come near, from proximus, nearest; see per in Indo-European roots.]

prox′i·mate·ly adv.
prox′i·mate·ness n.

proximate

(ˈprɒksɪmɪt) or

proximal

adj
1. next or nearest in space or time
2. very near; close
3. immediately preceding or following in a series
4. a less common word for approximate
[C16: from Late Latin proximāre to draw near, from Latin proximus next, from prope near]
ˈproximately adv
ˈproximateness n
ˌproxiˈmation n

prox•i•mate

(ˈprɒk sə mɪt)

adj.
1. next; nearest; immediately before or after in order, place, occurrence, etc.
2. close; very near.
3. forthcoming; imminent.
4. approximate; fairly accurate.
[1590–1600; < Late Latin proximātus, past participle of proximāre to near, approach. See proximal, -ate1]
prox′i•mate•ly, adv.
prox′i•mate•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.proximate - closest in degree or order (space or time) especially in a chain of causes and effects; "news of his proximate arrival"; "interest in proximate rather than ultimate goals"
ultimate - furthest or highest in degree or order; utmost or extreme; "the ultimate achievement"; "the ultimate question"; "man's ultimate destiny"; "the ultimate insult"; "one's ultimate goal in life"
2.proximate - very close in space or time; "proximate words"; "proximate houses"
close - at or within a short distance in space or time or having elements near each other; "close to noon"; "how close are we to town?"; "a close formation of ships"

proximate

adjective
1. Not far from another in space, time, or relation:
2. About to occur at any moment:
Translations

proximate

adj
(= next)nächste(r, s), folgende(r, s), sich unmittelbar anschließend, unmittelbar; proximate causeunmittelbare Ursache
(= close, very near)nahe liegend
(= forthcoming, imminent)kurz bevorstehend
(= approximate)annähernd, ungefähr; proximate estimateungefähre Schätzung; proximate analysis (Chem) → quantitative Analyse
References in classic literature ?
If so, will the Judge make it convenient to be present, and favor the auctioneer with his bid, On the proximate occasion?
This was the proximate cause, I suppose, of my dreaming about him, for what appeared to me to be half the night; and dreaming, among other things, that he had launched Mr.
But he said quietly: "The proximate cause, doubtless.
We may say, speaking somewhat roughly, that a stimulus applied to the nervous system, like a spark to dynamite, is able to take advantage of the stored energy in unstable equilibrium, and thus to produce movements out of proportion to the proximate cause.
As the fog had been the proximate cause of this sumptuous repast, so the fog served for its general sauce.
Answering this question requires understanding both the proximate basis of cooperative behavior and its comparative biology, but studies integrating experimental and comparative approaches are rare.
During the Fifth Circuit hearing, GBRA's appellate attorney Aaron Streett of the firm Baker Botts LLP argued that TAP failed to prove proximate cause as a matter of law because the chain of causation from permit holder to alleged harm to the cranes was too attenuated to constitute proximate cause.
Reinhold Niebuhr, the great Protestant theologian, wrote that the best we can do is to create proximate solutions to insoluble problems.
We studied the behavioral changes in a group of 22 marabou storks following the addition of 2 shade cloth barriers to their enclosure; we documented all occurrences of aggressive behavior, as well as time spent proximate to the barriers (or the space between barrier posts, when the shade cloth was removed) and time spent using the barriers to block the view of other storks.
The drunk driver's negligence may be both a factual and proximate cause of all of Mrs.
Thus, implementation of composite flour technology is thought to be an appropriate intervention to improve the proximate composition of the traditional bread, thereby showing an alternative way of utilizing maize by humans.
of Louisville, Kentucky), so he has updated and expanded his beginning textbook, and reinforced the focus on ultimate and proximate causation and emphasis on natural selection, learning, and cultural transmission.