prudentialism


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prudentialism

(pruːˈdɛnʃəlɪzəm)
n
a regard for prudential, rather than moral, considerations

prudentialism

a doctrine of philosophy that is prudential.
See also: Philosophy
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References in periodicals archive ?
Kennedy's prudentialism toward resolving the tension between the
See Table 1 for a presentation of a typology of theories of judicial review with prudentialism included].
164) This approach therefore reconciles, in a way, the classical view of Wechsler with the prudentialism of Bickel.
Prudentialism and the notion of the rational actor has also been strongly linked to correctional policies on risk (Kemshall 2006).
An Aristotelian prudentialism without the modeling offered by social order is a non-starter, I would have thought.
It does so, however, at the expense of prudentialism and practical reason.
252, 257 (1992) (describing prudentialism in part as "the privatization of public benefits as an aspect of the extension of privatized risk-based technique").
36) But the problem persists if one thinks that prudentialism should play any role whatsoever in judicial decisionmaking.
It was quite another thing for priests trained to a reticent prudentialism to implement such reform in the parishes that were their lives.
92) So the point of legal prudentialism in Judge Posner's scheme is just to contract the scope of democratic decisionmaking so as to expand the scope for transactional decisionmaking.
Unlike the prudentialism of Brandeis, Frankfurter, and Bickel, it is not concerned with protecting and preserving the institutions of governing--they are all the same anyway, on this view.