prudentialist

prudentialist

(pruːˈdɛnʃəlɪst)
n
a person who acts prudentially
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, Fisher is too quick to dismiss prudentialist arguments that the conditions of the modern world require an expanded role for the executive over matters of national security.
That is because, for a prudentialist, an important part of the work of courts is to achieve good consequences through a careful combination of judicial assertion and judicial restraint--through knowing when to intervene and when to stay aloof, when to goad the political branches into action and when to avoid creating unnecessary strife that risks backlash and reaction.
Although he offers an objectivist alternative to the moral theories of prudentialists, relativists, subjectivists, and indifferentists, he does so in a way that makes constructive use of the core of their concerns: self-interest, plurality, perspective and context, and irreducible gaps between value and fact.