pseudepigrapha


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pseud·e·pig·ra·pha

 (so͞o′dĭ-pĭg′rə-fə)
pl.n.
1. Spurious writings, especially writings falsely attributed to biblical characters or times.
2. A body of texts written between 200 bc and ad 200 and spuriously ascribed to various prophets and kings of the Hebrew Scriptures.

[Greek, from neuter pl. of pseudepigraphos, falsely ascribed : pseudēs, false; see pseudo- + epigraphein, to inscribe (epi-, epi- + graphein, to write; see gerbh- in Indo-European roots).]

pseud′e·pig′ra·phal (-rə-fəl), pseud′ep·i·graph′ic (so͞o′dĕp-ĭ-grăf′ĭk), pseud′ep·i·graph′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl), pseud′e·pig′ra·phous (-rə-fəs) adj.

Pseudepigrapha

(ˌsjuːdɪˈpɪɡrəfə)
pl n
1. (Bible) various Jewish writings from the first century bc to the first century ad that claim to have been divinely revealed but which have been excluded from the Greek canon of the Old Testament. Also called (in the Roman Catholic Church): Apocrypha
2. (Judaism) various Jewish writings from the first century bc to the first century ad that claim to have been divinely revealed but which have been excluded from the Greek canon of the Old Testament. Also called (in the Roman Catholic Church): Apocrypha
[C17: from Greek pseudepigraphos falsely entitled, from pseudo- + epigraphein to inscribe]
Pseudepigraphic, ˌPseudepiˈgraphical, ˌPseudeˈpigraphous adj

pseud•e•pig•ra•pha

(ˌsu dəˈpɪg rə fə)

n.pl.
certain writings other than the canonical books and the Apocrypha professing to be Biblical in character.
[1685–95; < New Latin < Greek, neuter pl. of pseudepígraphos falsely inscribed, bearing a false title. See pseud-, epigraph, -ous]
pseud`ep•i•graph′ic (-dɛp ɪˈgræf ɪk) adj.

pseudepigrapha

the spurious writings (other than the canonical books and the Apocrypha) professing to be biblical in character, as the Books of Enoch. — pseudepigraphic, pseudepigraphical, pseudepigraphous, adj.
See also: Bible
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Pseudepigrapha - 52 texts written between 200 BC and AD 200 but ascribed to various prophets and kings in the Hebrew scriptures; many are apocalyptic in nature
religious text, religious writing, sacred text, sacred writing - writing that is venerated for the worship of a deity
References in periodicals archive ?
Whereas the Kerygma Petri is still treated along with the Epistle to the Laodiceans, the Correspondence between Seneca and Paul, and the Pseudo-Titus Epistle under the heading "Apostolic Pseudepigrapha," the Kerygmata Petrou are now classed more logically with the Pseudo-Clementines.
Wintermute, "Jubilees: A New Translation and Introduction," in Old Testament Pseudepigrapha, vol.
examines include texts from Genesis, the Prophets, the Apocrypha (Ben Sira and Wisdom of Solomon), the Pseudepigrapha (The Testaments of the 12 Patriarchs and The Book of Jubilees), Philo, Josephus, and rabbinic literature (Midrash Bereshith Rabbah).
In terms of his second purpose, he does an excellent job providing full analyses of the issue of ex eventu prediction in Daniel, 1 Enoch, certain Dead Sea Scrolls (Pseudo-Daniel, 4QJeremiah, the Ezekiel Pseudepigrapha, the Damascus Document, certain Pesharim, 11QMelchizedek), and also the Sibylline Oracles (written by Hellenized Jews, far from Jerusalem).
Examples of the latter include "The Qumran Manuscripts: Contents and Significance"; "The Vocabulary of the Qumran Sectarian Texts"; "Sectarian and Nonsectarian Texts from Qumran: The Pertinence and Use of a Taxonomy"; "Between Sectarian and Nonsectarian: The Case of the Apocryphon of Joshua"; "Between Qumran Sectarian and Qumran Nonsectarian Texts: The Case of Belial and Mastema"; and "Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha at Qumran.
His principal sources are the Bible, including the Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha, Josephus, the Elephantine archive (fifth century), the Zeno Papyri (third century), the Dead Sea Scrolls, and archaeology.
Pseudepigraphic Perspectives: The Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha in Light of the Dead Sea Scrolls (Leiden: Brill, 1997) p.
Andrews in Scotland, who translated the Hebrew text and reported on it in an article in the book "Old Testament Pseudepigrapha More Noncanonical Scriptures Volume 1.
Journal for the Study of the Pseudepigrapha Supplement, 35.
The Lost Books of the Bible: The Rejected Texts, Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha.
They include the following in reverse order of publication: The Pseudepigrapha on Sexuality, Attitudes Towards Sexuality in Apocalypses, Testaments, Legends, Wisdom, and Related Literature (2011); Sexuality in the New Testament, Understanding the Key Texts (2010); Enoch, Levi, and Jubilees on Sexuality, Attitudes Towards Sexuality in the Early Enoch literature, The Aramaic Levi Document, and the Book of Jubilees (2007); Sexuality and the Jesus Tradition (2005); The Septuagint, Sexuality, and the New Testament, Case Studies on the Impact of the LXX in Philo and the New Testament (2004).
Many recent commentators simply acknowledge the New Testament's use of the apocrypha and pseudepigrapha and explain the text without addressing it as a theological problem.