psychagogy


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psychagogics, psychagogy

a method of affecting behavior by assisting in the choice of desirable life goals. — psychagogue, n.
See also: Behavior
the guiding of a soul, especially that of a person recently dead into the lower world. — psychagogue, n. — psychagogic, adj.
See also: Soul
References in periodicals archive ?
Charles Baudouin (1893-1963), a Nancy-born psychoanalyst, and a sometime student of Henri Bergson, Edouard Claparede (and Pierre Bouvet), Alfred Adler, Carl Jung, and Sigmund Freud, established the International Institute of Psychagogy and Psychotherapy in 1924.
Like Kallipolis, Socrates is a kind of icon, transparent for the philosophical goal of self-knowledge, and so an encounter with him is an often painful psychagogy, a cathartic seduction of souls to the difficult way of philosophy.
Coming back to pragmatic concerns in the third section, essays hone in on Plutarch's systematic moral psychagogy in the Moralia and Parallel Lives.
In exploring how Augustine adapted classical psychagogy ("cure of souls," a subset of ancient rhetoric focused on guiding hearers to apprehend wisdom for themselves [9, 201]), K.
s reading, Augustine counters the elite nature of classical psychagogy by preaching to the masses, inviting them into a shared "exegetical exercise in Christian liturgy" (12) and encouraging them to reflect on how the Scriptures reveal to hearers their need for healing (182).
2009), "Foreword: Pedagogy, Psychagogy, Demagogy", in Peters, M.
1995) Paul and Philodemus: Adaptability in Epicurean and Early Christian Psychagogy, NovTSup 81.
In short these different motives, whether repressed or not, acknowledged or displaced, show that the journey to 'elsewhere' and towards 'the other" is for its beneficiary a sort of psychagogy.