psychosurgery

(redirected from psychiatric surgery)
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psy·cho·sur·ger·y

 (sī′kō-sûr′jə-rē)
n. pl. psy·cho·sur·ger·ies
Brain surgery used to treat severe, intractable mental or behavioral disorders.

psy′cho·sur′geon (-sûr′jən) n.
psy′cho·sur′gi·cal (-jĭ-kəl) adj.

psychosurgery

(ˌsaɪkəʊˈsɜːdʒərɪ)
n
(Surgery) any surgical procedure on the brain, such as a frontal lobotomy, to relieve serious mental disorders
psychosurgical adj

psy•cho•sur•ger•y

(ˌsaɪ koʊˈsɜr dʒə ri)

n.
treatment of mental disorders by means of brain surgery.
[1935–40]
psy`cho•sur′geon (-dʒən) n.
psy`cho•sur′gi•cal (-dʒɪ kəl) adj.

psychosurgery

the use of brain surgery to treat mental disorders. — psychosurgeon, n.
See also: Brain
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.psychosurgery - brain surgery on human patients intended to relieve severe and otherwise intractable mental or behavioral problems
brain surgery - any surgical procedure involving the brain
amygdalotomy - psychosurgery in which amygdaloid fibers that mediate limbic system activity are severed (in cases of extreme uncontrollable violence)
callosectomy, callosotomy - severing the corpus callosum so that communication between the cerebral hemispheres is interrupted (in cases of severe intractable epilepsy)
frontal lobotomy, leucotomy, leukotomy, lobotomy, prefrontal leucotomy, prefrontal leukotomy, prefrontal lobotomy - surgical interruption of nerve tracts to and from the frontal lobe of the brain; often results in marked cognitive and personality changes
Translations

psychosurgery

[ˌsaɪkəʊˈsɜːdʒərɪ] Npsicocirugía f
References in periodicals archive ?
Coroner Mary Hassell read a statement from his consultant psychiatrist to the court that revealed she had helped him find his own flat because his father wanted him to undergo psychiatric surgery for his schizophrenia in Somalia.
Dr Marie Lawrence, of the Seabrook mental health team, wrote a letter to the housing department in which she said: "There is no evidence that psychiatric surgery will improve his condition.
Deep brain stimulation research is haunted by one of the most reviled episodes of medical history-the psychiatric surgery boom of the early and mid-20th century, characterized by lobotomies and abuses of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT).

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