psychobiography

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Related to psychobiographical: psychobiography

psy·cho·bi·og·ra·phy

 (sī′kō-bī-ŏg′rə-fē)
n. pl. psy·cho·bi·og·ra·phies
1. A biography that analyzes the psychological makeup, character, or motivations of its subject: "We are given a kind of psychobiography which ultimately pictures a deeply egotistical individual, unable to tolerate anyone else's success" (Leon Botstein).
2. A character analysis.

psy′cho·bi·og′ra·pher n.
psy′cho·bi′o·graph′ic (-bī′ə-grăf′ĭk), psy′cho·bi·o·graph′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.

psychobiography

(ˌsaɪkəʊbaɪˈɒɡrəfɪ)
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a biography that pays particular attention to a person's psychological development
psychobiographical adj

psy•cho•bi•og•ra•phy

(ˌsaɪ koʊ baɪˈɒg rə fi, -bi-)

n., pl. -phies.
a biography that stresses childhood trauma and unconscious motives of the subject.
[1930–35]
psy`cho•bi•og′ra•pher, n.
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References in periodicals archive ?
8) He notes the Laureate's unhappy, and quite possibly abused, childhood years: psychobiographical fodder which Perry treats cautiously but which nonetheless appears to confirm Auden's verdict that "[i]n no other English poet of comparable rank does the bulk of his work seem so clearly to be inspired by some single and probably very early experience" (p.
Comparable to the pictures of the toddler in "La Vie d'Artiste," these images of guinea pigs and sheep could possibly be interpreted as self-portraits or, in fact, as the fruits of a project of displaced self-portraiture that does everything in its power precisely to dispel any such psychobiographical reading.
CUSTER AND THE LITTLE BIG HORN: A Psychobiographical Inquiry (1981), for a specific look at how Custer's "personality may have affected his actions at [Little Big Horn].
In the process of transference, the Symbolic register in Lacan and the metaphors in Lakoff and Johnson help readers to recognize the psychobiographical experiences that shape the fictional world of the subject in fantasy narratives.
19) The psychobiographical implications of the relationship between Wordsworth and Coleridge in 1800 have been discussed by various critics.
While some found it "an intensely political film so wildly inventive and witty it will become a touchstone for years to come" (Weissberg 34), others expressed an ill-concealed distrust for "its hyperbaroque visual stylings, acid-tinged psychobiographical satire, and fantasy-like rendering of controversial issues" (Crowdus 34).
Ignoring several recent psychobiographical readings on Hawthorne and the gender, sexual anxieties experienced by the antebellum middle class in America, McFarland portrays the marriage of Sophia and Nathaniel in terms of traditional devotion and love throughout their lives.
The affective creation of the aspect of malevolence proceeds through 'unreal', evolutions; it is a coming into being of the demonic as iconic visage, which gathers diabolical strength precisely when it keeps crossing the borders of psychobiographical plausibility.
The fact that psychobiographical studies are becoming part of mainstream personality psychology should come as no surprise.
Shenk has no psychobiographical theory or therapy to promote, nor does he nurture any Byronic illusions about the redemptive or creative powers of melancholy.
cannot legitimately transgress the text towards something other than it, toward a referent (a reality that is metaphysical, historical, psychobiographical, etc.
This reliance on distance psychoanalysis is, of course, the most obvious criticism of all psychobiographical works, including Dr.