psychodrama

(redirected from psychodramas)
Also found in: Medical.

psy·cho·dra·ma

 (sī′kə-drä′mə, -drăm′ə)
n.
1. A psychotherapeutic technique in which people are assigned roles to be played spontaneously within a dramatic context devised by a therapist in order to understand the behavior of people with whom they have difficult interactions.
2. A dramatization in which this technique is employed.
3. An event, social interaction, or narrative that manifests psychological forces or problems: "In [Pierre, Melville] abruptly reinvents himself as a domestic novelist, proposing to write a psychodrama of family intimacy" (Richard H. Brodhead).

psy′cho·dra·mat′ic (-drə-măt′ĭk) adj.
psy′cho·dram′a·tist (-drăm′ə-tĭst, -drä′mə-) n.

psychodrama

(ˈsaɪkəʊˌdrɑːmə)
n
1. (Psychiatry) psychiatry a form of group therapy in which individuals act out, before an audience, situations from their past
2. (Film) a film, television drama, etc, in which the psychological development of the characters is emphasized
3. (Broadcasting) a film, television drama, etc, in which the psychological development of the characters is emphasized
psychodramatic adj

psy•cho•dra•ma

(ˌsaɪ koʊˈdrɑ mə, -ˈdræm ə, ˈsaɪ koʊˌdrɑ mə, -ˌdræm ə)

n.
a method of group psychotherapy in which participants improvise in dramatizations of emotionally charged situations.
[1935–40]
psy`cho•dra•mat′ic (-drəˈmæt ɪk) adj.

psychodrama

1. The acting out of relationships or feelings in an attempt to release and identify repressed emotions.
2. A therapy which aims to help individuals release their emotions by acting out real life situations.
Translations

psychodrama

[ˈsaɪkəʊˌdrɑːmə] Npsicodrama m

psy·cho·dra·ma

n. psicodrama, método de terapia psíquica en el cual se dramatizan situaciones conflictivas de la vida del paciente con la participación de éste.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Past reporters turned musicians include Amy Winehouse and Chrissie Hynde and Booker's vengeance and hurtfuelled psychodramas match those noble scribes for performance intensity.
Ed Miliband said: "One of the lessons for Labour is that we do need to move on from some of the psychodramas of the past, some of the factionalism that there was.
But even in light of the visceral psychodramas the remainder of the century would bring ( Alban Berg's Wozzeck, Bluebeard and James MacMillan's InAs de Castro ( Salome can still make its power felt in a performance with this commitment.
We had moments when we were falling about in fits of giggles,'' acknowledges Watts, who's known mainly for heart-wrenching psychodramas such as ``Mulholland Dr.
Winters's complex matrices and Dunham's slapstick psychodramas seemed out of place among paintings by younger artists obsessed with systems, mass media, and new technology.
Watts admits she enjoys doing intense psychodramas.
I'd like to see psychodramas used more, as their integration can facilitate the speed and effectiveness of many treatment methods.
But if the euphemisms, denials, and their compensatory ritual psychodramas are to subside, more than the racial climate and the structural inequities some blame it on will have to change.
More than a few of us have rehearsed (and re-rehearsed) scenarios where we did finally say and do the right thing, acting out little psychodramas where we play a better, nobler version of ourselves.
Psychodramas can be created around dream material, drama characters being the most vivid elements of the dream.
Working alongside Maya Deren, Kenneth Anger, Jonas Mekas and Michael Snow, Brakhage made a stunning variety of films, everything from psychodramas to cinematic diaries to abstract expressionist films.
The group performed psychodramas showing how male employees might react to working alongside women.