psychogenesis

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Related to psychogeny: gruntle, Ginormous, Seater

psy·cho·gen·e·sis

 (sī′kə-jĕn′ĭ-sĭs)
n.
1. The origin and development of psychological processes, personality, or behavior.
2. Development of a disorder or illness resulting from psychological rather than physiological factors.

psy′cho·ge·net′ic (-jə-nĕt′ĭk) adj.
psy′cho·ge·net′i·cal·ly adv.

psychogenesis

(ˌsaɪkəʊˈdʒɛnɪsɪs)
n
(Psychology) psychol the study of the origin and development of personality, human behaviour, and mental processes. Also called: psychogenetics
psychogenetic, psychogenetical adj
ˌpsychogeˈnetically adv

psy•cho•gen•e•sis

(ˌsaɪ koʊˈdʒɛn ə sɪs)

n.
1. the origin and development of a psychological or behavioral state.
2. the emotional cause of or contribution to symptoms of a disorder.
[1830–40]
psy`cho•ge•net′ic (-dʒəˈnɛt ɪk) adj.

psychogenesis

the appearance of physical symptoms as a result of emotional problems. — psychogenic, psychogenetic, adj.
See also: Disease and Illness
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.psychogenesis - the development in the life of an individual of some disorder that is caused by psychological rather than physiological factors
growing, growth, ontogenesis, ontogeny, maturation, development - (biology) the process of an individual organism growing organically; a purely biological unfolding of events involved in an organism changing gradually from a simple to a more complex level; "he proposed an indicator of osseous development in children"
2.psychogenesis - a general term for the origin and development of almost any aspect of the mind
growing, growth, ontogenesis, ontogeny, maturation, development - (biology) the process of an individual organism growing organically; a purely biological unfolding of events involved in an organism changing gradually from a simple to a more complex level; "he proposed an indicator of osseous development in children"
References in periodicals archive ?
psychogeny, medication-induced, stroke, and multiple sclerosis); (2) a clear history of PD or essential tremor (ET) in the family; (3) an obvious lesions of intracephalic structure on head computed tomography (CT)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans.