psychomachia


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psychomachia

(ˌsaɪkəʊˈmækɪə) or

psychomachy

n
(Psychology) conflict of the soul
[C17: from Late Latin psӯchomachia, title of a poem by Prudentius (about 400), from Greek psukhē spirit + makhē battle]
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Launcelot Gobbo, who thinks of his decision as a psychomachia with his conscience advocating obedience to authority and "the fiend" encouraging flight, is irremediably caught between two evils, since his conscience tells him to stay with "the Jew my master, who .
Proceeding to chapter 3, Paxson analyzes Prudentius's Psychomachia, a necessary text to consider for anyone studying personification, and he focuses on "a narratological program analyzing `layers' or levels of diegesis in Prudentius' narrative" (3).
In a tradition going back to Hesiod and elaborated in Prudentius's Psychomachia, the virtue set in opposition to libido is pudicitia, i.
By replacing the implied context of the blason--a relationship between a courtly admirer and a cruel mistress--with the autobiographical masque, Cavendish refigures the form to delineate her psychomachia.
Richard's abortive psychomachia i crude compared to the reminiscence with which Othello brings his life to a close.
The first considers the influence of psychomachia traditions in Anglo-Saxon England and the use of personification allegory to represent conflict in Old English poetry.
If The Lord of the Rings pits the forces of good and evil against each other in non-negotiable clashes of arms, it is an unsettling oddity that Gollum-Smeagol is given the opportunity to negotiate with himself in an inner psychomachia for redemption.
His placing the psychomachia, a battle fought between the forces of evil and the forces of good, within the soul of a boy is an innovative achievement.
12) Segun Peters, la interpretacion alegorica del personaje comienza con el poema latino medieval Psychomachia, de Aurelius Prudentius Clemens (348-410), en el que se declara el triunfo de las virtudes sobre los vicios y se alaba a Judith como paradigma de castitas doblegando a Lujuria (115 n.
Stapleton has written that in the Elegies Marlowe yokes Ovid's troubled and volatile persona "to the psychomachia paradigm of late medieval morality plays, replete with angelus bonus and angelus malus that .
The use of weapons as metaphors for the role of the cardinal virtues (fortitude, temperance, prudence, justice) in the human struggle against sin goes back to at least the fifth century and the allegorical poem Psychomachia, composed by the poet Prudentius.
3) Also included are devices that resemble medieval psychomachia, wherein Becket is confronted by four internal Tempters, and subsequently killed by four stylized Knights, who, in part 2, break the faintly medieval decorum of the play to speak in the frank terms of a modern English politician.