psychopathology


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Related to psychopathology: psychopathy

psy·cho·pa·thol·o·gy

 (sī′kō-pə-thŏl′ə-jē, -pă-)
n.
1. The study of the origin, development, and manifestations of mental or behavioral disorders.
2. The manifestation of a mental or behavioral disorder.

psy′cho·path′o·log′ic (-păth′ə-lŏj′ĭk), psy′cho·path′o·log′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
psy′cho·pa·thol′o·gist n.

psychopathology

(ˌsaɪkəʊpəˈθɒlədʒɪ)
n
(Psychiatry) the scientific study of mental disorders
psychopathological adj
ˌpsychopaˈthologist n

psy•cho•pa•thol•o•gy

(ˌsaɪ koʊ pəˈθɒl ə dʒi)

n., pl. -gies.
1. the study of the causes, conditions, and processes of mental disorders.
2. the systematic description of a mental disorder.
[1840–50]
psy`cho•path`o•log′i•cal (-ˌpæθ əˈlɒdʒ ɪ kəl) psy`cho•path`o•log′ic, adj.
psy`cho•pa•thol′o•gist, n.

psychopathology

1. the branch of medicine that studies the causes and nature of mental disease.
2. the pathology of mental disease. — psychopathologist, n. — psychopathologie, psychopathological, adj.
See also: Medical Specialties
Medicine. the science of the diseases of the mind. — psychopathologist, psychopathist, n.psychopathologie, psychopathological, adj.
See also: Psychology
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.psychopathology - the branch of psychology concerned with abnormal behaviorpsychopathology - the branch of psychology concerned with abnormal behavior
psychological science, psychology - the science of mental life
2.psychopathology - the branch of medicine dealing with the diagnosis and treatment of mental disorderspsychopathology - the branch of medicine dealing with the diagnosis and treatment of mental disorders
echolalia - (psychiatry) mechanical and meaningless repetition of the words of another person (as in schizophrenia)
resistance - (psychiatry) an unwillingness to bring repressed feelings into conscious awareness
paramnesia - (psychiatry) a disorder of memory in which dreams or fantasies are confused with reality
autism - (psychiatry) an abnormal absorption with the self; marked by communication disorders and short attention span and inability to treat others as people
confabulation - (psychiatry) a plausible but imagined memory that fills in gaps in what is remembered
medical specialty, medicine - the branches of medical science that deal with nonsurgical techniques
alienism - an obsolete term for the study and treatment of mental illness
mental hygiene, psychotherapeutics, psychotherapy - the branch of psychiatry concerned with psychological methods
acting out - (psychiatry) the display of previously inhibited emotions (often in actions rather than words); considered to be healthy and therapeutic
compensation - (psychiatry) a defense mechanism that conceals your undesirable shortcomings by exaggerating desirable behaviors
conversion - (psychiatry) a defense mechanism represses emotional conflicts which are then converted into physical symptoms that have no organic basis
defence, defence mechanism, defence reaction, defense mechanism, defense reaction, defense - (psychiatry) an unconscious process that tries to reduce the anxiety associated with instinctive desires
denial - (psychiatry) a defense mechanism that denies painful thoughts
displacement - (psychiatry) a defense mechanism that transfers affect or reaction from the original object to some more acceptable one
idealisation, idealization - (psychiatry) a defense mechanism that splits something you are ambivalent about into two representations--one good and one bad
intellectualisation, intellectualization - (psychiatry) a defense mechanism that uses reasoning to block out emotional stress and conflict
isolation - (psychiatry) a defense mechanism in which memory of an unacceptable act or impulse is separated from the emotion originally associated with it
overcompensation - (psychiatry) an attempt to overcome a real or imagined defect or unwanted trait by overly exaggerating its opposite
projection - (psychiatry) a defense mechanism by which your own traits and emotions are attributed to someone else
rationalisation, rationalization - (psychiatry) a defense mechanism by which your true motivation is concealed by explaining your actions and feelings in a way that is not threatening
reaction formation - (psychiatry) a defense mechanism in which a person unconsciously develops attitudes and behavior that are the opposite of unacceptable repressed desires and impulses and serve to conceal them; "his strict morality is just a reaction formation to hide his sexual drive"
regression - (psychiatry) a defense mechanism in which you flee from reality by assuming a more infantile state
repression - (psychiatry) the classical defense mechanism that protects you from impulses or ideas that would cause anxiety by preventing them from becoming conscious
anorexia nervosa - (psychiatry) a psychological disorder characterized by somatic delusions that you are too fat despite being emaciated
folie, mental disorder, mental disturbance, psychological disorder, disturbance - (psychiatry) a psychological disorder of thought or emotion; a more neutral term than mental illness
anxiety, anxiousness - (psychiatry) a relatively permanent state of worry and nervousness occurring in a variety of mental disorders, usually accompanied by compulsive behavior or attacks of panic
major depressive episode - (psychiatry) a state of depression with all the classic symptoms (anhedonia and lethargy and sleep disturbance and despondency and morbid thoughts and feelings of worthlessness and sometimes attempted suicide) but with no known organic dysfunction
repress, suppress - put out of one's consciousness
psychoanalyse, psychoanalyze, analyse, analyze - subject to psychoanalytic treatment; "I was analyzed in Vienna by a famous psychiatrist"
confabulate - unconsciously replace fact with fantasy in one's memory
Translations
psychopatologie

psychopathology

[ˈsaɪkəʊpəˈθɒlədʒɪ] Npsicopatología f

psy·cho·pa·thol·o·gy

n. psicopatología, rama de la medicina que trata de las causas y naturaleza de las enfermedades mentales.
References in periodicals archive ?
I have successfully used this approach to explain important phenomena in psychopathology research, such as comorbidity, spontaneous recovery, and prevalence differences between disorders.
The 18 outpatients who participated in this 12-month, prospective, observational study showed significant improvements in many measures of psychopathology after the switch to long-acting injectable therapy.
We approach the study of psychopathology in these terms: "the study of the calamities of the soul," by which we mean that students are learning how to assess, treat, and prevent concerns that affect the whole person, the embodied soul.
Brain evolution, language and psychopathology in schizophrenia.
Their stated objective is to suggest ways in which culture can be 'incorporated into the applied utility of psychopathology formulation', [1] a concern motivated by the increasingly accepted position that culture is central to psychiatric theory and practice.
Suggestions and implications for future research in further explicating the role of gender role orientation in the divergence of male body image psychopathology are discussed.
The goal of this study was to examine the trajectory of bonding impairment across the first six months postpartum in the context of maternal risk, including maternal history of childhood abuse and neglect and postpartum psychopathology, and to test the association between self-reported bonding impairment and observed positive parenting behaviours.
This compilation of essays is divided into five parts: The Developmental Psychopathology Approach to Understanding Behavior, Risk Factors for Psychopathology, Externalizing Behavior Disorders, Internalizing Behavior Disorders, and Other Psychological Disorders.
However, while the SCC levels of psychopathology generally worsened, the SCS group improved overall, with significant changes in the oppositional defiant and generalized anxiety symptom categories.
The association between psychopathology and substance use has been extensively researched, particularly within the last three decades.
The classification of psychopathology has progressed beyond describing symptoms to being a science, since Millon (Institute for Advanced Studies in Personology and Psychopathology; retired, Harvard Medical School) co-edited Contemporary Directions in Psychopathology: Toward the DSM-IV (Guilford Press, 1986).
The results of the study have shown that it is possible to distinguish four groups of pathological gamblers based on their personality traits and associated psychopathology.