psychosis

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Related to psychoses: neurosis

psy·cho·sis

 (sī-kō′sĭs)
n. pl. psy·cho·ses (-sēz)
An acute or chronic mental state marked by loss of contact with reality, disorganized speech and behavior, and often hallucinations or delusions, seen in certain mental illnesses, such as schizophrenia, and other medical disorders.

psychosis

(saɪˈkəʊsɪs)
n, pl -choses (-ˈkəʊsiːz)
(Psychiatry) any form of severe mental disorder in which the individual's contact with reality becomes highly distorted. Compare neurosis
[C19: New Latin, from psycho- + -osis]

psy•cho•sis

(saɪˈkoʊ sɪs)

n., pl. -ses (-sēz).
1. a mental disorder characterized by symptoms, as delusions or hallucinations, that indicate impaired contact with reality.
2. any severe form of mental disorder, as schizophrenia or paranoia.
[1840–50]

psy·cho·sis

(sī-kō′sĭs)
Plural psychoses (sī-kō′sēz)
A mental illness so severe that a person loses the ability to think logically, to communicate, and to relate to others. A person with a psychosis loses contact with reality and often shows dramatic changes in behavior. Psychoses can be caused by diseases affecting the brain.

psychotic (sī-kŏt′ĭk) adjective

psychosis

any severe mental disorder or disease. — psychotic, n., adj.
See also: Insanity
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.psychosis - any severe mental disorder in which contact with reality is lost or highly distorted
mental disease, mental illness, psychopathy - any disease of the mind; the psychological state of someone who has emotional or behavioral problems serious enough to require psychiatric intervention
delirium tremens, DTs - acute delirium caused by alcohol poisoning
paranoia - a psychological disorder characterized by delusions of persecution or grandeur
dementia praecox, schizophrenia, schizophrenic disorder, schizophrenic psychosis - any of several psychotic disorders characterized by distortions of reality and disturbances of thought and language and withdrawal from social contact
Translations
psychóza
psykoosi
psychoza
psihoză

psychosis

[saɪˈkəʊsɪs] N (psychoses (pl)) [saɪˈkəʊsiːz]psicosis f inv

psychosis

[saɪˈkəʊsɪs] [psychoses] [saɪˈkəʊsiːz] (pl) npsychose f

psychosis

n pl <psychoses> → Psychose f

psychosis

[saɪˈkəʊsɪs] n (psychoses (pl)) [saɪˈkəʊsiːz‘]psicosi f inv

psy·cho·sis

n. psicosis, trastorno mental severo de origen orgánico o emocional en el cual el paciente pierde contacto con la realidad y sufre de alucinaciones o aberraciones mentales;
alcoholic ______ alcohólica;
depressive ______ depresiva;
drug ______ por drogas;
manic-depressive ______ maníaco depresiva;
organic ______ orgánica;
senile ______ senil;
situational ______ situacional;
toxic ______ tóxica;
traumatic ______ traumática.

psychosis

n (pl -ses) psicosis f
References in periodicals archive ?
While PIP is typically fleeting, with abatement following a few days to weeks, perpetual psychoses may create since intermittent scenes or smooth a solitary scene (Tarulli 2001).
On alternative psychoses of paranoid nature in "forced normalization" (Landolt) of the electroencephalogram of epileptics [in German].
Without treatment, these psychoses can last many months but with modern therapy they usually resolve within a few weeks.
Friedman, "The management of the levodopa psychoses," Clinical Neuropharmacology, vol.
Acute psychoses associated with the use of ciprofloxacin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole.
The above findings concerning genes of small effect enable the calculation of a polygenic risk score estimating an individual's genetic liability to schizophrenia and similar psychoses.
Cycloid psychoses are characterized by polymorphic symptomatology with intraphasic bipolarity, a remitting and recurrent course and favorable prognosis (1-2).
ABSTRACT Objectives: This paper seeks to provide an overview of the motives, rationale, theoretical underpinnings and foundational literature of the early Intervention movement for psychoses.
Of those who convert to psychosis, about 80% develop a schizophrenia spectrum disorder, and about 20% develop mood or atypical psychoses.
Affective and non-affective psychoses have a major negative impact on human society.
The study found schizophrenia and other psychoses affect three in 100 people in Ireland causing severe distress to themselves and their families.
Early treatment in schizophrenia and other psychoses has been linked to better outcomes," the authors write as background information in the article.