public interest


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public interest

n.
1. The well-being of the general public; the commonweal.
2. The attention of the people with respect to events.
References in classic literature ?
On the completion of the Columbiad the public interest centered in the projectile itself, the vehicle which was destined to carry the three hardy adventurers into space.
She had read the letter to the family, and Rowena had danced away to see to the cleaning and airing of the room by the slave woman, Nancy, and the boys had rushed abroad in the town to spread the great news, for it was a matter of public interest, and the public would wonder and not be pleased if not informed.
As public interest was in question, and transatlantic communications suffered, their veracity could not be doubted.
Gradually it leaked out that Scarlett Trent was the buyer, and public interest leaped up at once.
Yet in reality those personal interests of the moment so much transcend the general interests that they always prevent the public interest from being felt or even noticed.
At that epoch of pristine simplicity, however, matters of even slighter public interest, and of far less intrinsic weight than the welfare of Hester and her child, were strangely mixed up with the deliberations of legislators and acts of state.
Treason, then -- deep menaces, concealed under the semblance of public interest -- such were Colbert's maneuvers.
What qualifications were necessary in those who are to be created new lords: whether the humour of the prince, a sum of money to a court lady, or a design of strengthening a party opposite to the public interest, ever happened to be the motive in those advancements?
Then three or four western bad men aspired to clean out the town, were riddled like pepper-boxes for their pains, and public interest turned to other idols.
Henson and Sir George Cayley - had much weakened the public interest in the subject of aerial navigation.
About the same time the whole stock of the author's books was destroyed by fire, keeping them out of print at a critical moment; and public interest, which until then had been on the increase, gradually began to diminish.
It may be true--it looks reasonable enough--but as long as those parties can't vote anymore, the matter can be of no great public interest.

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